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Riparian Soil Seed Banks and the Potential for Passive Restoration of Giant Reed Infested Areas in Webb County, Texas

Riparian Soil Seed Banks and the Potential for Passive Restoration of Giant Reed Infested Areas... Restoration Notes Restoration Notes have been a distinguishing feature of Ecological Restoration for more than 25 years. This section is geared toward introducing innovative research, tools, technologies, programs, and ideas, as well as providing short-term research results and updates on ongoing efforts. Please direct submissions and inquiries to the editorial staff (ERjournal@ aesop.rutgers.edu). Amede Rubio (corresponding author: Department of Biology and Chemistry, Texas A&M International University 5201 University Blvd., Laredo, TX, amede.rubio@tamiu.edu), Alexis E. Racelis (Department of Biology, The University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX), Thomas C. Vaughan (Department of Biology and Chemistry, Texas A&M International University 5201 University Blvd., Laredo, TX) and John A. Goolsby (United States Department of AgricultureAgricultural Research Service, 2413 E. Hwy. 83, Weslaco, TX). ative landscapes like riparian areas continually undergo changes through land management practices, exotic species invasions, and/or natural processes (Poff et al. 2011, Racelis et al. 2012). Overtime, heavy disturbances and/or exotic species invasions could deplete soil seed banks (Reid et al. 2009). As a consequence, soil seed banks become an increasingly important ecosystem component that can prevent extirpation of native plant species (Moody-Weis and Alexander 2007) and facilitate survival of rare species for future generations (Coteff and Van Auken http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Riparian Soil Seed Banks and the Potential for Passive Restoration of Giant Reed Infested Areas in Webb County, Texas

Ecological Restoration , Volume 32 (4) – Nov 3, 2014

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University of Wisconsin Press
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Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
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1543-4079
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Abstract

Restoration Notes Restoration Notes have been a distinguishing feature of Ecological Restoration for more than 25 years. This section is geared toward introducing innovative research, tools, technologies, programs, and ideas, as well as providing short-term research results and updates on ongoing efforts. Please direct submissions and inquiries to the editorial staff (ERjournal@ aesop.rutgers.edu). Amede Rubio (corresponding author: Department of Biology and Chemistry, Texas A&M International University 5201 University Blvd., Laredo, TX, amede.rubio@tamiu.edu), Alexis E. Racelis (Department of Biology, The University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX), Thomas C. Vaughan (Department of Biology and Chemistry, Texas A&M International University 5201 University Blvd., Laredo, TX) and John A. Goolsby (United States Department of AgricultureAgricultural Research Service, 2413 E. Hwy. 83, Weslaco, TX). ative landscapes like riparian areas continually undergo changes through land management practices, exotic species invasions, and/or natural processes (Poff et al. 2011, Racelis et al. 2012). Overtime, heavy disturbances and/or exotic species invasions could deplete soil seed banks (Reid et al. 2009). As a consequence, soil seed banks become an increasingly important ecosystem component that can prevent extirpation of native plant species (Moody-Weis and Alexander 2007) and facilitate survival of rare species for future generations (Coteff and Van Auken

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Nov 3, 2014

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