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Resurgence of Native Plants after Removal of Amur Honeysuckle from Bender Mountain Preserve, Ohio

Resurgence of Native Plants after Removal of Amur Honeysuckle from Bender Mountain Preserve, Ohio odor problems. This implies that we might have used a onicera maackii (Amur honeysuckle) is an Asian shrub considerably thinner compost envelope and still have had Lthat was introduced to North America by Botanical good results. We would not recommend using less than a Gardens in the 1890’s (Luken and Thieret 1996). The shrub 50 cm-thick envelope, especially if the compost were not produces red berries that are eaten by birds. e Th birds very biologically active. deposit the seeds in old shrub borders, hedges, wasteland Future research could determine minimum thickness and woodlands (Dirr 1983). e Th tendency of L. maackii to of compost layers over encapsulated soil and minimum reproduce and spread beyond the point of initial planting temperatures and their duration required for the same was first recorded in archives of the Morton Arboretum effect to be achieved. Field studies might also investigate near Chicago in the mid-1920’s (Luken and Thieret 1996). possible improvements to eradication methods for existing As early as 1961, E.  Lucy Braun noted that L.  maackii stands of knotweed using the mechanisms described here. had escaped from cultivation in Hamilton County, Ohio For example, perhaps adding a layer of compost or other (Braun 1961). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Resurgence of Native Plants after Removal of Amur Honeysuckle from Bender Mountain Preserve, Ohio

Ecological Restoration , Volume 34 (3) – Aug 9, 2016

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1543-4079

Abstract

odor problems. This implies that we might have used a onicera maackii (Amur honeysuckle) is an Asian shrub considerably thinner compost envelope and still have had Lthat was introduced to North America by Botanical good results. We would not recommend using less than a Gardens in the 1890’s (Luken and Thieret 1996). The shrub 50 cm-thick envelope, especially if the compost were not produces red berries that are eaten by birds. e Th birds very biologically active. deposit the seeds in old shrub borders, hedges, wasteland Future research could determine minimum thickness and woodlands (Dirr 1983). e Th tendency of L. maackii to of compost layers over encapsulated soil and minimum reproduce and spread beyond the point of initial planting temperatures and their duration required for the same was first recorded in archives of the Morton Arboretum effect to be achieved. Field studies might also investigate near Chicago in the mid-1920’s (Luken and Thieret 1996). possible improvements to eradication methods for existing As early as 1961, E.  Lucy Braun noted that L.  maackii stands of knotweed using the mechanisms described here. had escaped from cultivation in Hamilton County, Ohio For example, perhaps adding a layer of compost or other (Braun 1961).

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Aug 9, 2016

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