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Restoration through Food and Fellowship at Waipa, Kaua’i

Restoration through Food and Fellowship at Waipa, Kaua’i PERSPECTIVE Rebecca L. Vidra n the Waipa valley, on the northern shore of Kaua'i, Hawaii, community members gather to practice "malama `aina" or deep love and stewardship of the land. As one youth told me "We have love for this `aina. It is special because there are not that many places left for us. And we need to take care of our kupuna (elders) by protecting this land." Here, the relationship between restoring land and restoring culture is not only visible but celebrated. Most of the valleys along Kaua`i's North Shore used to host large swaths of coastal wetlands that were converted to taro fields by the Polynesians, who settled the Hawaiian Islands in 300­800 AD (Muller et al. 2010). Many of these fields remained in taro until they were converted to rice fields by Chinese and Japanese immigrants in the late 1800s (Harrington 2008). In the 1920s, the price of rice plummeted and these fields have been more recently reclaimed for taro. In an area with incredibly high property values, these taro fields represent most of the green "open" space on the North Shore of Kauai and, in some places, are beginning to be encroached upon by http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Restoration through Food and Fellowship at Waipa, Kaua’i

Ecological Restoration , Volume 32 (4) – Nov 3, 2014

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University of Wisconsin Press
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Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
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1543-4079
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Abstract

PERSPECTIVE Rebecca L. Vidra n the Waipa valley, on the northern shore of Kaua'i, Hawaii, community members gather to practice "malama `aina" or deep love and stewardship of the land. As one youth told me "We have love for this `aina. It is special because there are not that many places left for us. And we need to take care of our kupuna (elders) by protecting this land." Here, the relationship between restoring land and restoring culture is not only visible but celebrated. Most of the valleys along Kaua`i's North Shore used to host large swaths of coastal wetlands that were converted to taro fields by the Polynesians, who settled the Hawaiian Islands in 300­800 AD (Muller et al. 2010). Many of these fields remained in taro until they were converted to rice fields by Chinese and Japanese immigrants in the late 1800s (Harrington 2008). In the 1920s, the price of rice plummeted and these fields have been more recently reclaimed for taro. In an area with incredibly high property values, these taro fields represent most of the green "open" space on the North Shore of Kauai and, in some places, are beginning to be encroached upon by

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Nov 3, 2014

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