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Resting Places

Resting Places JEFFREY GRAY Marit J. MacArthur, The American Landscape in the Poetry of Frost, Bishop, and Ashbery: The House Abandoned. New York: Palgrave, 2008. 257 pp. $80.00. arit J. MacArthur's The American Landscape in the Poetry of Frost, Bishop, and Ashbery: The House Abandoned offers an unabashedly biographical reading of three of the most important twentiethcentury poets. Coming after several decades of a largely antisubjective bias in poetry criticism, MacArthur's approach prompts questions. Does this book constitute an intervention to correct a critical view that assumes that language is not representative but constitutive of our reality? Is it biography as of yore, or is it biography the second time around, informed by what heretofore discredited it? That is, are we to retire what has been seen as indispensable in discussions of poetry and poetics-- poetry's complex relation to "reality," and the constructedness of biography? The tripartite organization of the book reflects its three purposes; as the jacket description explains, MacArthur "scrutinizes the popular notion of Frost as a deeply rooted New Englander, demonstrates that Frost had an underestimated influence on Bishop--whose obsession with travel is the obverse of his preoccupation with houses and dwelling--and questions dominant, anti-biographical readings of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Literature University of Wisconsin Press

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1548-9949
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Abstract

JEFFREY GRAY Marit J. MacArthur, The American Landscape in the Poetry of Frost, Bishop, and Ashbery: The House Abandoned. New York: Palgrave, 2008. 257 pp. $80.00. arit J. MacArthur's The American Landscape in the Poetry of Frost, Bishop, and Ashbery: The House Abandoned offers an unabashedly biographical reading of three of the most important twentiethcentury poets. Coming after several decades of a largely antisubjective bias in poetry criticism, MacArthur's approach prompts questions. Does this book constitute an intervention to correct a critical view that assumes that language is not representative but constitutive of our reality? Is it biography as of yore, or is it biography the second time around, informed by what heretofore discredited it? That is, are we to retire what has been seen as indispensable in discussions of poetry and poetics-- poetry's complex relation to "reality," and the constructedness of biography? The tripartite organization of the book reflects its three purposes; as the jacket description explains, MacArthur "scrutinizes the popular notion of Frost as a deeply rooted New Englander, demonstrates that Frost had an underestimated influence on Bishop--whose obsession with travel is the obverse of his preoccupation with houses and dwelling--and questions dominant, anti-biographical readings of

Journal

Contemporary LiteratureUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Apr 2, 2011

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