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Reforestation and Restoration at the Cloud Forest School in Monteverde, Costa Rica: Learning by Doing

Reforestation and Restoration at the Cloud Forest School in Monteverde, Costa Rica: Learning by... Now we have over 300 members and 13 schools participating in the Habitat Network. Our smallest member is a household. Our largest member is a community organization with 1,000 members. Membership is free; our members simply need to commit to creating some native habitat. We now have people seeking us out to become members of the Habitat Network and we are networking with other councils and related organizations. This project is easy to promote here in Australia, because almost everyone has seen birdlife in their gardens diminish and feels concerned. Our members have also planted native shrubs on public lands to create new bushland islands and to eliminate open bushland edges and thereby reduce exposure of small bird populations to predation from larger birds. This is a stimulating project that allows us to engage people from all walks of life. We have spread the word about the Habitat Network wherever opportunities arise, including environmental and sustainability forums, council-run events, children's playgroups, and school groups. We have organized and run bush walks, talks, planting days (Figure 2), and nursery visits. We are happy to arrange any activity that is appropriate to increase the knowledge of our members about natural http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Reforestation and Restoration at the Cloud Forest School in Monteverde, Costa Rica: Learning by Doing

Ecological Restoration , Volume 28 (2) – Jun 10, 2010

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
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Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
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1543-4079
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Abstract

Now we have over 300 members and 13 schools participating in the Habitat Network. Our smallest member is a household. Our largest member is a community organization with 1,000 members. Membership is free; our members simply need to commit to creating some native habitat. We now have people seeking us out to become members of the Habitat Network and we are networking with other councils and related organizations. This project is easy to promote here in Australia, because almost everyone has seen birdlife in their gardens diminish and feels concerned. Our members have also planted native shrubs on public lands to create new bushland islands and to eliminate open bushland edges and thereby reduce exposure of small bird populations to predation from larger birds. This is a stimulating project that allows us to engage people from all walks of life. We have spread the word about the Habitat Network wherever opportunities arise, including environmental and sustainability forums, council-run events, children's playgroups, and school groups. We have organized and run bush walks, talks, planting days (Figure 2), and nursery visits. We are happy to arrange any activity that is appropriate to increase the knowledge of our members about natural

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Jun 10, 2010

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