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Reducing Cirsium arvense (Canada Thistle) Using Spike Seeding: Six Years Later

Reducing Cirsium arvense (Canada Thistle) Using Spike Seeding: Six Years Later Restoration Notes Restoration Notes have been a distinguishing feature of Ecological Restoration for more than 25 years. This section is geared toward introducing innovative research, tools, technologies, programs, and ideas, as well as providing short-term research results and updates on ongoing efforts. Please direct submissions and inquiries to the editorial staff (ERjournal@ sebs.rutgers.edu). treatment 4 vs non-spike 12.25%; large plot, spike treat - Reducing Cirsium arvense (Canada ment 2.8 vs non-spike 14.2%). It was speculated at the time Thistle) Using Spike Seeding: Six Years that the native forbs used for the spike treatment would go Later from high cover to lower cover due normal successional Paula Comeau (Department of Natural Resources, Division forces as the reconstruction matured, resulting in a diverse of Parks and Trails, Glyndon MN), Jack E. Norland (corre- prairie reconstruction. e Th objectives of this update were sponding author: School of Natural Resources Sciences, North to determine: 1) whether spike species dominate the plant Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58108, Jack.N orland@ community over time, and 2)  whether the spike species had impacts on the establishment of other planted species. NDSU.edu), Cami S. Dixon (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Seven different sites were used in the study. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Reducing Cirsium arvense (Canada Thistle) Using Spike Seeding: Six Years Later

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System
ISSN
1543-4079

Abstract

Restoration Notes Restoration Notes have been a distinguishing feature of Ecological Restoration for more than 25 years. This section is geared toward introducing innovative research, tools, technologies, programs, and ideas, as well as providing short-term research results and updates on ongoing efforts. Please direct submissions and inquiries to the editorial staff (ERjournal@ sebs.rutgers.edu). treatment 4 vs non-spike 12.25%; large plot, spike treat - Reducing Cirsium arvense (Canada ment 2.8 vs non-spike 14.2%). It was speculated at the time Thistle) Using Spike Seeding: Six Years that the native forbs used for the spike treatment would go Later from high cover to lower cover due normal successional Paula Comeau (Department of Natural Resources, Division forces as the reconstruction matured, resulting in a diverse of Parks and Trails, Glyndon MN), Jack E. Norland (corre- prairie reconstruction. e Th objectives of this update were sponding author: School of Natural Resources Sciences, North to determine: 1) whether spike species dominate the plant Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58108, Jack.N orland@ community over time, and 2)  whether the spike species had impacts on the establishment of other planted species. NDSU.edu), Cami S. Dixon (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Seven different sites were used in the study.

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: May 20, 2020

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