Preliminary Response of Soils to Decompaction with Rotary Aeration

Preliminary Response of Soils to Decompaction with Rotary Aeration Preliminary Response of Soils to Decompaction with Rotary Aeration Steven Yergeau (Corresponding author: Rutgers Coopera- tive Extension of Ocean County, 1623 Whitesville Rd, Toms River, NJ 08755-1199, yergeau@njaes.rutgers.edu) and Louise Wootton (Department of Biology, Georgian Court University, School of Arts & Sciences, Lakewood, NJ). oil compaction, the hardening of soil due to compress- Sing soil particles closer together, negatively aeff cts nearly all the properties and functions of soils whether they are physical, chemical, or biological in nature (Batey 2009). Compaction ae ff cts soil health in agriculture and horticulture as it inhibits root growth, hinders water infil - tration, and increases stormwater runo. A ff ny restoration work that involves seeding or planting vegetation should consider determining and/or managing soil compaction to ensure project success, and work to reduce compaction during and aer eff ft orts. Many techniques are available to reduce the negative effects of compaction, such as not using heavy machinery on wet soils, mechanically breaking up compacted soils, replacing topsoil, or planting vegetation prior to the for- mation of soil compaction. The goal of these management practices is to restore natural function to the soil. In New Jersey, USA in particular, improving soil health has http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Preliminary Response of Soils to Decompaction with Rotary Aeration

Ecological Restoration, Volume 37 (1) – Mar 18, 2019

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1543-4079

Abstract

Preliminary Response of Soils to Decompaction with Rotary Aeration Steven Yergeau (Corresponding author: Rutgers Coopera- tive Extension of Ocean County, 1623 Whitesville Rd, Toms River, NJ 08755-1199, yergeau@njaes.rutgers.edu) and Louise Wootton (Department of Biology, Georgian Court University, School of Arts & Sciences, Lakewood, NJ). oil compaction, the hardening of soil due to compress- Sing soil particles closer together, negatively aeff cts nearly all the properties and functions of soils whether they are physical, chemical, or biological in nature (Batey 2009). Compaction ae ff cts soil health in agriculture and horticulture as it inhibits root growth, hinders water infil - tration, and increases stormwater runo. A ff ny restoration work that involves seeding or planting vegetation should consider determining and/or managing soil compaction to ensure project success, and work to reduce compaction during and aer eff ft orts. Many techniques are available to reduce the negative effects of compaction, such as not using heavy machinery on wet soils, mechanically breaking up compacted soils, replacing topsoil, or planting vegetation prior to the for- mation of soil compaction. The goal of these management practices is to restore natural function to the soil. In New Jersey, USA in particular, improving soil health has

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Mar 18, 2019

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