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Predicting Post-Fire Tree Survival for Restoring Oak Ecosystems

Predicting Post-Fire Tree Survival for Restoring Oak Ecosystems Seastedt, T.R., R.J. Hobbs and K.N. Suding. 2008. Management of dominant native species, S. airoides, remains uncommon novel ecosystems: Are novel approaches required? Frontiers in elsewhere in this area. As a moderately productive bunch Ecology and the Environment 6:547–553. grass, this species is highly desirable for a variety of eco- system services and has maintained its abundance against the increased densities of the introduced brome grasses. e s Th uccess of B. tectorum is attributed to this plant’s ability to exploit early growing season moisture, but its ability to invade and grow in a relatively low nitrogen soil Predicting Post-Fire Tree Survival for remains an enigma. The annual grasses B.  tectorum and Restoring Oak Ecosystems B. arvensis have colonized areas between the initial seeded Scott R. Abella (corresponding author: University of Nevada sites of the 1998 planting and may have replaced species Las Vegas, School of Life Sciences, Las Vegas and Natural no longer common on the area. Resource Conservation LLC, 1400 Colorado Street, Boul- e u Th se of a seed mix in low nutrient soils initially der City, NV 89005, USA, scott.abella@unlv.edu), LaRae generated a novel, native plant community, but 12 years A. Sprow (Metroparks of the Toledo Area, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Predicting Post-Fire Tree Survival for Restoring Oak Ecosystems

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1543-4079

Abstract

Seastedt, T.R., R.J. Hobbs and K.N. Suding. 2008. Management of dominant native species, S. airoides, remains uncommon novel ecosystems: Are novel approaches required? Frontiers in elsewhere in this area. As a moderately productive bunch Ecology and the Environment 6:547–553. grass, this species is highly desirable for a variety of eco- system services and has maintained its abundance against the increased densities of the introduced brome grasses. e s Th uccess of B. tectorum is attributed to this plant’s ability to exploit early growing season moisture, but its ability to invade and grow in a relatively low nitrogen soil Predicting Post-Fire Tree Survival for remains an enigma. The annual grasses B.  tectorum and Restoring Oak Ecosystems B. arvensis have colonized areas between the initial seeded Scott R. Abella (corresponding author: University of Nevada sites of the 1998 planting and may have replaced species Las Vegas, School of Life Sciences, Las Vegas and Natural no longer common on the area. Resource Conservation LLC, 1400 Colorado Street, Boul- e u Th se of a seed mix in low nutrient soils initially der City, NV 89005, USA, scott.abella@unlv.edu), LaRae generated a novel, native plant community, but 12 years A. Sprow (Metroparks of the Toledo Area,

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: May 28, 2019

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