Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Pottery Making of Sakhalin Island in Historical Dynamics: From the Neolithic to the Paleometal Period

Pottery Making of Sakhalin Island in Historical Dynamics: From the Neolithic to the Paleometal... Abstract: This paper examines the correlation between pottery-making dynamics and cultural-historical processes on Sakhalin Island, focusing on the period of transition from the Neolithic to the Paleo-metal period. Utilizing assemblages from sites of the Susuya culture and Okhotsk cultures, change can be observed in three main categories: those caused by cultural or ethnocultural interaction and evolving processes; those caused by economic innovations; and developments due to technological innovations. Evidence of these developments can be seen in the complicated progressive change in prehistoric technologies during the mid-first century to the twelfth or thirteenth centuries A.D. The bearers of the Okhotsk culture replaced Neolithic traditions entirely, adopting a new ornamental style. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Arctic Anthropology University of Wisconsin Press

Pottery Making of Sakhalin Island in Historical Dynamics: From the Neolithic to the Paleometal Period

Arctic Anthropology , Volume 47 (2) – Jan 27, 2010

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-wisconsin-press/pottery-making-of-sakhalin-island-in-historical-dynamics-from-the-tuSmL5066p

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1933-8139
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract: This paper examines the correlation between pottery-making dynamics and cultural-historical processes on Sakhalin Island, focusing on the period of transition from the Neolithic to the Paleo-metal period. Utilizing assemblages from sites of the Susuya culture and Okhotsk cultures, change can be observed in three main categories: those caused by cultural or ethnocultural interaction and evolving processes; those caused by economic innovations; and developments due to technological innovations. Evidence of these developments can be seen in the complicated progressive change in prehistoric technologies during the mid-first century to the twelfth or thirteenth centuries A.D. The bearers of the Okhotsk culture replaced Neolithic traditions entirely, adopting a new ornamental style.

Journal

Arctic AnthropologyUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Jan 27, 2010

There are no references for this article.