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Potential Reinvasion of Lonicera maackii after Urban Riparian Forest Restoration

Potential Reinvasion of Lonicera maackii after Urban Riparian Forest Restoration <p>ABSTRACT:</p><p>The invasive shrub, <i>Lonicera maackii</i>, is known to change forest ecosystem communities and functions; however, few have studied the potential for this prolific invader to return after forest restoration. We studied the forest understory, canopy, seed bank, and incoming <i>L. maackii</i> seed rain in a riparian urban forest five to nine years after <i>L. maackii</i> removal and restoration efforts. We found the restored areas maintained a native canopy, but by nine years post-management efforts, <i>L. maackii</i> was becoming more important along multiple transects due to many small individual seedlings. The restored areas had greater herbaceous cover and species richness when compared to the control area (<i>L. maackii</i>-dominated). <i>Lonicera maackii</i> was not common in the seed bank during the study but was more prevalent in the seed rain of the restored forest with a tree canopy than in the restored open field without a tree canopy. While our results support the premise that removing <i>L. maackii</i> returns the community to a more native state, the study also shows that the native state would not last without additional minor intervention. Monitoring beyond ten years post-removal will be key to telling the whole reinvasion story, but management efforts every five to ten years could suffice to keep a restored forest dominated by native species.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Potential Reinvasion of Lonicera maackii after Urban Riparian Forest Restoration

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1543-4079

Abstract

<p>ABSTRACT:</p><p>The invasive shrub, <i>Lonicera maackii</i>, is known to change forest ecosystem communities and functions; however, few have studied the potential for this prolific invader to return after forest restoration. We studied the forest understory, canopy, seed bank, and incoming <i>L. maackii</i> seed rain in a riparian urban forest five to nine years after <i>L. maackii</i> removal and restoration efforts. We found the restored areas maintained a native canopy, but by nine years post-management efforts, <i>L. maackii</i> was becoming more important along multiple transects due to many small individual seedlings. The restored areas had greater herbaceous cover and species richness when compared to the control area (<i>L. maackii</i>-dominated). <i>Lonicera maackii</i> was not common in the seed bank during the study but was more prevalent in the seed rain of the restored forest with a tree canopy than in the restored open field without a tree canopy. While our results support the premise that removing <i>L. maackii</i> returns the community to a more native state, the study also shows that the native state would not last without additional minor intervention. Monitoring beyond ten years post-removal will be key to telling the whole reinvasion story, but management efforts every five to ten years could suffice to keep a restored forest dominated by native species.</p>

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Mar 18, 2019

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