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Performance and Phenotypic Variation of American Chestnut (Castanea dentata) Hybrids on Newly Reclaimed Mine Sites in Eastern Ohio, USA

Performance and Phenotypic Variation of American Chestnut (Castanea dentata) Hybrids on Newly... RESEARCH ARTICLE Keith E. Gilland and Brian C. McCarthy ABSTRACT Surface mining for coal represents a significant form of anthropogenic disturbance on the landscape. Currently there are more than one million hectares of former mined land in the United States. New reclamation procedures are being examined to accelerate forest succession on former coal mine sites in eastern Appalachia. Our study was conducted on public lands that had been previously surface-mined for coal, reclaimed in 1978, and re-mined and reclaimed using new methods in 2007. We planted 535 American chestnut seeds in March 2008 at the study site in 107 blocks. Each block contained five seeds from five different genetic lines including , , and three intergraded hybrid Chinese-American lines. We saw few significant differences in performance between chestnuts and more advanced backcrossed generations of hybrid trees. However, Chinese chestnut and early-generation hybrids showed significantly better growth and survival measurements. The American Chestnut Foundation's breeding program appears to have been successful at capturing a morphological fidelity between the latest hybrids and trees. Trees with a greater percentage of Chinese parental material possess a suite of leaf characters that may make those hybrids better suited for the arid, high light http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Performance and Phenotypic Variation of American Chestnut (Castanea dentata) Hybrids on Newly Reclaimed Mine Sites in Eastern Ohio, USA

Ecological Restoration , Volume 32 (4) – Nov 3, 2014

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
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Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
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1543-4079
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Abstract

RESEARCH ARTICLE Keith E. Gilland and Brian C. McCarthy ABSTRACT Surface mining for coal represents a significant form of anthropogenic disturbance on the landscape. Currently there are more than one million hectares of former mined land in the United States. New reclamation procedures are being examined to accelerate forest succession on former coal mine sites in eastern Appalachia. Our study was conducted on public lands that had been previously surface-mined for coal, reclaimed in 1978, and re-mined and reclaimed using new methods in 2007. We planted 535 American chestnut seeds in March 2008 at the study site in 107 blocks. Each block contained five seeds from five different genetic lines including , , and three intergraded hybrid Chinese-American lines. We saw few significant differences in performance between chestnuts and more advanced backcrossed generations of hybrid trees. However, Chinese chestnut and early-generation hybrids showed significantly better growth and survival measurements. The American Chestnut Foundation's breeding program appears to have been successful at capturing a morphological fidelity between the latest hybrids and trees. Trees with a greater percentage of Chinese parental material possess a suite of leaf characters that may make those hybrids better suited for the arid, high light

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Nov 3, 2014

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