Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Patterns of Population Differentiation in Early Traits of Development in Elymus glaucus : Implications for Restoration

Patterns of Population Differentiation in Early Traits of Development in Elymus glaucus :... RESEARCH ARTICLE Carolina Fonseca, Erin Espeland and James W. Baxter ABSTRACT Restoration of native plant communities is a foundational practice in restoration ecology, but land managers and biologists don't often take into account the role of intraspecific variation in establishment of restoration seedings. Although ecologists have known for decades that lack of adaptation to local conditions may interfere with the success of , there is little information about the extent to which species demonstrate adaptive divergence among populations. If adaptive divergence occurs for early establishment, knowing which populations have better germination and early growth can maximize restoration performance. Restoration of California grassland requires species establishment in both riparian and upland habitats. To what degree does local adaptation to these habitats influence early growth traits? In this study, we compared time to germination and early growth rate of riparian, upland, and commercial seed sources of blue wild rye (Elymus glaucus) under contrasting water regimes in a controlled environment. Two hypotheses were tested: 1) plants grown from commercial seeds will outperform plants grown from locally-collected seeds under controlled conditions; and 2) plants will demonstrate local adaptation by high performance of riparian sources under high water treatments and high performance of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Patterns of Population Differentiation in Early Traits of Development in Elymus glaucus : Implications for Restoration

Ecological Restoration , Volume 32 (4) – Nov 3, 2014

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-wisconsin-press/patterns-of-population-differentiation-in-early-traits-of-development-02Xd0nFiHF
Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1543-4079
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

RESEARCH ARTICLE Carolina Fonseca, Erin Espeland and James W. Baxter ABSTRACT Restoration of native plant communities is a foundational practice in restoration ecology, but land managers and biologists don't often take into account the role of intraspecific variation in establishment of restoration seedings. Although ecologists have known for decades that lack of adaptation to local conditions may interfere with the success of , there is little information about the extent to which species demonstrate adaptive divergence among populations. If adaptive divergence occurs for early establishment, knowing which populations have better germination and early growth can maximize restoration performance. Restoration of California grassland requires species establishment in both riparian and upland habitats. To what degree does local adaptation to these habitats influence early growth traits? In this study, we compared time to germination and early growth rate of riparian, upland, and commercial seed sources of blue wild rye (Elymus glaucus) under contrasting water regimes in a controlled environment. Two hypotheses were tested: 1) plants grown from commercial seeds will outperform plants grown from locally-collected seeds under controlled conditions; and 2) plants will demonstrate local adaptation by high performance of riparian sources under high water treatments and high performance of

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Nov 3, 2014

There are no references for this article.