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Ora (direis) puxar conversa! (review)

Ora (direis) puxar conversa! (review) Luso-Brazilian Review 47:2 genation, that is the focal point of Helena Holgersson-Shorter's essay. Particularly intriguing are the connections this essay establishes between Monticello's architecture with its "false fronts, secret connecting staircases, and tricks of light and shadow" (65), the shift ing discourse he employs regarding the mulatto in Virginian society, and the probability that Jefferson had helped father not only a nation, but also mixed-race children through his slave mistress. The challenge of any volume of essays is to avoid a compilation of isolated studies that rarely dialogue with one another. Masters and the Slaves goes a long way in ensuring that a conceptual overlap exists throughout, with its multi-faceted critique of discourses that paradoxically embrace hybridity while maintaining a hegemonic, post-colonialist position. While a few of the essays arguably suffer from excessive jargon, the majority are clearly written and authoritative. It is surprising that, given the scope of the project, more attention is not given to theories of mestizaje in Spanish America. This is not necessarily a flaw, given that it is Brazil that normally gets omitted in studies purporting to cover "Latin America." However, an essay that explicitly juxtaposed, for example Freyre's discourse on miscegenation and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Luso-Brazilian Review University of Wisconsin Press

Ora (direis) puxar conversa! (review)

Luso-Brazilian Review , Volume 47 (2) – Jan 30, 2010

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University of Wisconsin Press
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Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
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1548-9957
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Abstract

Luso-Brazilian Review 47:2 genation, that is the focal point of Helena Holgersson-Shorter's essay. Particularly intriguing are the connections this essay establishes between Monticello's architecture with its "false fronts, secret connecting staircases, and tricks of light and shadow" (65), the shift ing discourse he employs regarding the mulatto in Virginian society, and the probability that Jefferson had helped father not only a nation, but also mixed-race children through his slave mistress. The challenge of any volume of essays is to avoid a compilation of isolated studies that rarely dialogue with one another. Masters and the Slaves goes a long way in ensuring that a conceptual overlap exists throughout, with its multi-faceted critique of discourses that paradoxically embrace hybridity while maintaining a hegemonic, post-colonialist position. While a few of the essays arguably suffer from excessive jargon, the majority are clearly written and authoritative. It is surprising that, given the scope of the project, more attention is not given to theories of mestizaje in Spanish America. This is not necessarily a flaw, given that it is Brazil that normally gets omitted in studies purporting to cover "Latin America." However, an essay that explicitly juxtaposed, for example Freyre's discourse on miscegenation and

Journal

Luso-Brazilian ReviewUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Jan 30, 2010

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