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OCBILs, YODFELs, and NENEGOLs

OCBILs, YODFELs, and NENEGOLs EDITORIAL tephen Hopper, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, recently published an article describing special regions of the world that he terms OCBILS, or Old, Climatically Buffered Infertile Landscapes (Hopper 2009). Hopper argues that conservation and restoration of very old, weathered landscapes like those found in southwestern Australia, South Africa's Cape region, and Venezuela's Pantepui highlands require a rethinking of conventional ecological theory. These are places where an absence of recent glaciations or other major disturbances is an important factor in creating plant life that is extraordinarily diverse, long-lived, marked by a high number of rare endemics, and reflects a number of coping strategies for living on infertile soil, such as symbiosis, carnivory, parasitism, and salinity tolerance. Hopper describes landscapes where most of us live as YODFELs--Young, Often-Disturbed Fertile Landscapes, and argues that ecological theory needs some opening up and new approaches in order to contend with OCBILs, because YODFELs have informed most of the thinking in the field. Having recently visited Australia's southwestern floristic region, I require no convincing that novel approaches are needed in order to conserve and restore that unique landscape, which superficially reminded me so much of my desert home in the southwestern http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

OCBILs, YODFELs, and NENEGOLs

Ecological Restoration , Volume 28 (1) – Jun 10, 2010

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University of Wisconsin Press
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Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
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1543-4079
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Abstract

EDITORIAL tephen Hopper, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, recently published an article describing special regions of the world that he terms OCBILS, or Old, Climatically Buffered Infertile Landscapes (Hopper 2009). Hopper argues that conservation and restoration of very old, weathered landscapes like those found in southwestern Australia, South Africa's Cape region, and Venezuela's Pantepui highlands require a rethinking of conventional ecological theory. These are places where an absence of recent glaciations or other major disturbances is an important factor in creating plant life that is extraordinarily diverse, long-lived, marked by a high number of rare endemics, and reflects a number of coping strategies for living on infertile soil, such as symbiosis, carnivory, parasitism, and salinity tolerance. Hopper describes landscapes where most of us live as YODFELs--Young, Often-Disturbed Fertile Landscapes, and argues that ecological theory needs some opening up and new approaches in order to contend with OCBILs, because YODFELs have informed most of the thinking in the field. Having recently visited Australia's southwestern floristic region, I require no convincing that novel approaches are needed in order to conserve and restore that unique landscape, which superficially reminded me so much of my desert home in the southwestern

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Jun 10, 2010

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