Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

North American Wildland Plants, Third Edition. A Field Guide by James Stubbendieck et al. (review)

North American Wildland Plants, Third Edition. A Field Guide by James Stubbendieck et al. (review) in grazing production operations with some additional comments on the value to wildlife (for the most part wild Reviews game). However, the wildlife and human applications seem more an aer ft thought to increase readership. While certainly valuable to a grazing land manager, I find these Book Review descriptions dated given our contemporary focus on the ecosystem function and services provided by the native North American Wildland Plants, species in our grazing lands. It was quite disappointing to Third Edition. A Field Guide see native plants described as worthless and I longed for James Stubbendieck, Stephan L. Hatch, Neal M. Bryan, and some discussion of the larger importance of these species Cheryl D. Dunn. 2017. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska within their respective ecosystems, if not in the descrip- Press. $35.00 paperback. ISBN: 978-0-80-329965-8. 528 tions in the introductory text. At a minimum, the guide pages. could be improved by more comprehensively addressing North American Wildland Plants. A Field Guide by James these species’ respond to fire management, an increasingly Stubbendieck, Stephan L. Hatch, Neal M. Bryan, and key component of grazing land management. I sincerely Cheryl D. Dunn provides a user friendly update to a classic hope the users of this guide can see beyond these dated guide covering some of the most notable plants of North descriptions and consider how these species function in America’s rangelands. Originally assembled in 1981, the their relevant communities. Those looking to revegetate third edition of the guide in its present form contains and restore native grasslands throughout North America additional revisions to informative plant illustrations and will need to look elsewhere for more detailed ecological descriptions. The guide is based on the Master Plant List contributions of these species. for the International Range Plant Identification Contest e s Th pecies covered in the guide are the more promi - sponsored by the Society for Range Management. In its nent rangeland species found throughout North America aim to serve as a reference for students training for the and the guide is meant to introduce users to both native competition, the guide provides an excellent introduc- and non-native species. Users interested in their local flora tion to species of interest across North American range- will need to supplement this guide with a more regional lands. The guide begins with a series of useful, descriptive guide, as this guide is not locally comprehensive for any drawings illustrating key plant features and terminology particular region. e Th strength of this guide appears to be followed by a two-page treatment for each of over 200 spe - with plant species of the western and south western states. cies billed as important to rangelands throughout North While some species presented have fairly narrow geo- America. Comprehensive botanical descriptions are aided graphical ranges within western North America, there are with detailed and well-annotated drawings that are certain key species in the northern and eastern regions that have to be of use for the novice botanist. been omitted (e.g., Russian Olive, Buckthorn, Tall Fescue). Each species receives a two-page treatment including As such, while I will certainly use some of the images a full-page, labeled illustration augmented with enlarged within my botany courses, I cannot use this as a main text illustrations of key plant parts and a full-page description for my plant identification courses in the Northern Plains. outlining the species inflorescence, vegetative, growth, Assembling a field guide that is of wide interest is a and habitat characteristics. Nearly half of the species list challenging task and this guide provides another valuable contains notable North American grasses. The spikelet addition to the collection. With the detailed descriptions drawings and annotations are some of the best that I have and high-quality images, it provides a user-friendly intro- seen in contemporary field guides. Even as I read through duction for novice botanists to supplement more regional the guide, I made note of the images that I would use in field guides and the more comprehensive dichotomous my own Systematic Botany course. Particularly impressive keys that cover the region. The authors make it clear that are those of the spikelet structure in species such as Andro- this guide is meant as an international training manual pogon gerardi (big bluestem), Spartina pectinata (prairie for range plant identification, so it should be used with cordgrass), and Bromus inermis (smooth brome), images an understanding that the treatment of the ecological that I’ve long sought for helping beginners understand the contributions of these species is limited. spikelet structure of these grasses. e det Th ailed descriptions and drawings are supple - Kathryn A. Yurkonis (Kathryn.Yurkonis@und.edu) is mented with descriptions of the use of these plants in graz- an Associate Professor in the Department of Biology at ing applications with additional notation on traditional University of North Dakota in Grand Forks. and has research interests in invasion and grassland restoration uses where known. In doing so, the authors make it very ecology within the central and northern plains. clear that this is a guide for students of range management. Species are described as excellent, good, fair, or worthless 62 • March 2019 ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION 37:1 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

North American Wildland Plants, Third Edition. A Field Guide by James Stubbendieck et al. (review)

Ecological Restoration , Volume 37 (1) – Mar 18, 2019

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-wisconsin-press/north-american-wildland-plants-third-edition-a-field-guide-by-james-Mv56Ggl492
Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1543-4079

Abstract

in grazing production operations with some additional comments on the value to wildlife (for the most part wild Reviews game). However, the wildlife and human applications seem more an aer ft thought to increase readership. While certainly valuable to a grazing land manager, I find these Book Review descriptions dated given our contemporary focus on the ecosystem function and services provided by the native North American Wildland Plants, species in our grazing lands. It was quite disappointing to Third Edition. A Field Guide see native plants described as worthless and I longed for James Stubbendieck, Stephan L. Hatch, Neal M. Bryan, and some discussion of the larger importance of these species Cheryl D. Dunn. 2017. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska within their respective ecosystems, if not in the descrip- Press. $35.00 paperback. ISBN: 978-0-80-329965-8. 528 tions in the introductory text. At a minimum, the guide pages. could be improved by more comprehensively addressing North American Wildland Plants. A Field Guide by James these species’ respond to fire management, an increasingly Stubbendieck, Stephan L. Hatch, Neal M. Bryan, and key component of grazing land management. I sincerely Cheryl D. Dunn provides a user friendly update to a classic hope the users of this guide can see beyond these dated guide covering some of the most notable plants of North descriptions and consider how these species function in America’s rangelands. Originally assembled in 1981, the their relevant communities. Those looking to revegetate third edition of the guide in its present form contains and restore native grasslands throughout North America additional revisions to informative plant illustrations and will need to look elsewhere for more detailed ecological descriptions. The guide is based on the Master Plant List contributions of these species. for the International Range Plant Identification Contest e s Th pecies covered in the guide are the more promi - sponsored by the Society for Range Management. In its nent rangeland species found throughout North America aim to serve as a reference for students training for the and the guide is meant to introduce users to both native competition, the guide provides an excellent introduc- and non-native species. Users interested in their local flora tion to species of interest across North American range- will need to supplement this guide with a more regional lands. The guide begins with a series of useful, descriptive guide, as this guide is not locally comprehensive for any drawings illustrating key plant features and terminology particular region. e Th strength of this guide appears to be followed by a two-page treatment for each of over 200 spe - with plant species of the western and south western states. cies billed as important to rangelands throughout North While some species presented have fairly narrow geo- America. Comprehensive botanical descriptions are aided graphical ranges within western North America, there are with detailed and well-annotated drawings that are certain key species in the northern and eastern regions that have to be of use for the novice botanist. been omitted (e.g., Russian Olive, Buckthorn, Tall Fescue). Each species receives a two-page treatment including As such, while I will certainly use some of the images a full-page, labeled illustration augmented with enlarged within my botany courses, I cannot use this as a main text illustrations of key plant parts and a full-page description for my plant identification courses in the Northern Plains. outlining the species inflorescence, vegetative, growth, Assembling a field guide that is of wide interest is a and habitat characteristics. Nearly half of the species list challenging task and this guide provides another valuable contains notable North American grasses. The spikelet addition to the collection. With the detailed descriptions drawings and annotations are some of the best that I have and high-quality images, it provides a user-friendly intro- seen in contemporary field guides. Even as I read through duction for novice botanists to supplement more regional the guide, I made note of the images that I would use in field guides and the more comprehensive dichotomous my own Systematic Botany course. Particularly impressive keys that cover the region. The authors make it clear that are those of the spikelet structure in species such as Andro- this guide is meant as an international training manual pogon gerardi (big bluestem), Spartina pectinata (prairie for range plant identification, so it should be used with cordgrass), and Bromus inermis (smooth brome), images an understanding that the treatment of the ecological that I’ve long sought for helping beginners understand the contributions of these species is limited. spikelet structure of these grasses. e det Th ailed descriptions and drawings are supple - Kathryn A. Yurkonis (Kathryn.Yurkonis@und.edu) is mented with descriptions of the use of these plants in graz- an Associate Professor in the Department of Biology at ing applications with additional notation on traditional University of North Dakota in Grand Forks. and has research interests in invasion and grassland restoration uses where known. In doing so, the authors make it very ecology within the central and northern plains. clear that this is a guide for students of range management. Species are described as excellent, good, fair, or worthless 62 • March 2019 ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION 37:1

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Mar 18, 2019

There are no references for this article.