Nature and The Ordinary as Sacred Foundations (review)

Nature and The Ordinary as Sacred Foundations (review) It is therefore disappointing that, due to time constraints based on creeping schedule delays, there was no opportunity to have a discussion at the end of the event as originally intended. Such a conversation would have allowed the speakers and audience to wrestle with the larger ideas--at times bridging, at times conflicting-- that their talks contributed. The single-venue format of the symposium would have been particularly conducive for such a discussion, and participants from other disciplines not represented among the speakers--such as architecture, engineering, and construction--could have offered their own important perspectives. Nevertheless, much could be gleaned from the short question-and-answer sessions following each talk. In particular, landscape architects, faculty, and students were especially vocal about the implications that Nature 3.x suggests for their field. As an architect, I admit that my knowledge of the landscape architecture discipline is limited--yet I could tell from the vigorous and probing dialogues that the post-natural condition presages tremendous disciplinary changes. Significantly, these transformations suggest novel design opportunities--such as prosthetic landscapes, manufactured ecologies, urban ecological phenotypes, future plants native to green roofs, and urban postnatural history tourism--all notions offered by Tucker. Thus, despite the negative news and misanthropic sentiment commonly associated with http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Landscape Journal: design, planning, and management of the land University of Wisconsin Press

Nature and The Ordinary as Sacred Foundations (review)


It is therefore disappointing that, due to time constraints based on creeping schedule delays, there was no opportunity to have a discussion at the end of the event as originally intended. Such a conversation would have allowed the speakers and audience to wrestle with the larger ideas--at times bridging, at times conflicting-- that their talks contributed. The single-venue format of the symposium would have been particularly conducive for such a discussion, and participants from other disciplines not represented among the speakers--such as architecture, engineering, and construction--could have offered their own important perspectives. Nevertheless, much could be gleaned from the short question-and-answer sessions following each talk. In particular, landscape architects, faculty, and students were especially vocal about the implications that Nature 3.x suggests for their field. As an architect, I admit that my knowledge of the landscape architecture discipline is limited--yet I could tell from the vigorous and probing dialogues that the post-natural condition presages tremendous disciplinary changes. Significantly, these transformations suggest novel design opportunities--such as prosthetic landscapes, manufactured ecologies, urban ecological phenotypes, future plants native to green roofs, and urban postnatural history tourism--all notions offered by Tucker. Thus, despite the negative news and misanthropic sentiment commonly associated with the Anthropocene epoch, this upside highlights the expanding role of the landscape architect and the ever-widening territory of his or her endeavors as global gardener. As Tucker declared, "It's time for nature to get an upgrade." However one might interpret this statement, landscape architects will offer a pivotal means for its realization. Blaine Brownell is Associate Professor in the School of Architecture at the University of Minnesota. NATURE AND THE ORDINARY AS SACRED FOUNDATIONS 7th Annual Symposium of...
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University of Wisconsin Press
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Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
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1553-2704
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Abstract

It is therefore disappointing that, due to time constraints based on creeping schedule delays, there was no opportunity to have a discussion at the end of the event as originally intended. Such a conversation would have allowed the speakers and audience to wrestle with the larger ideas--at times bridging, at times conflicting-- that their talks contributed. The single-venue format of the symposium would have been particularly conducive for such a discussion, and participants from other disciplines not represented among the speakers--such as architecture, engineering, and construction--could have offered their own important perspectives. Nevertheless, much could be gleaned from the short question-and-answer sessions following each talk. In particular, landscape architects, faculty, and students were especially vocal about the implications that Nature 3.x suggests for their field. As an architect, I admit that my knowledge of the landscape architecture discipline is limited--yet I could tell from the vigorous and probing dialogues that the post-natural condition presages tremendous disciplinary changes. Significantly, these transformations suggest novel design opportunities--such as prosthetic landscapes, manufactured ecologies, urban ecological phenotypes, future plants native to green roofs, and urban postnatural history tourism--all notions offered by Tucker. Thus, despite the negative news and misanthropic sentiment commonly associated with

Journal

Landscape Journal: design, planning, and management of the landUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Mar 15, 2015

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