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Native Warm-Season Grasses Resist Spotted Knapweed Resurgence

Native Warm-Season Grasses Resist Spotted Knapweed Resurgence rain from established native vegetation to replenish the soil seed bank. Habitat restoration projects can use seed bank information as early warning systems of patterns or degrees of habitat degradation; as changes in above ground vegetation directly impact below ground seed distribution (Looney and Gibson 1995, Cox and Allen 2008). In multiple strategy restoration efforts, seed bank quality can be used as a deciding factor in whether or not to incorporate costly re-vegetation or utilize alternative restoration methods (Abella and Springer 2008). However, we show that even after a heavy infestation of giant reed (Yang et. al 2011), the presence of viable seeds indicate that soil seed banks have the potential to initiate passive restoration. References Abella, S.R. and J.D. Springer. 2008. Estimating soil seed bank characteristics in Ponderosa Pine forests using vegetation and forest floor data. USDA forest service. RMRS-RN-35. Bell, G. 1997. Ecology and management of Arundo donax, and approaches to riparian habitat restoration in Southern California. Pages 103­113 in J.H. Brock, M. Wade, P. Pysek and D. Green (eds), Plant Invasions: Studies from North America and Europe. Leiden, Netherlands: Blackhuys Publishers. Coteff, C. and O.W. Van Auken. 2006. Sampling requirements for estimation of the soil http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Native Warm-Season Grasses Resist Spotted Knapweed Resurgence

Ecological Restoration , Volume 32 (4) – Nov 3, 2014

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University of Wisconsin Press
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Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
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1543-4079
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Abstract

rain from established native vegetation to replenish the soil seed bank. Habitat restoration projects can use seed bank information as early warning systems of patterns or degrees of habitat degradation; as changes in above ground vegetation directly impact below ground seed distribution (Looney and Gibson 1995, Cox and Allen 2008). In multiple strategy restoration efforts, seed bank quality can be used as a deciding factor in whether or not to incorporate costly re-vegetation or utilize alternative restoration methods (Abella and Springer 2008). However, we show that even after a heavy infestation of giant reed (Yang et. al 2011), the presence of viable seeds indicate that soil seed banks have the potential to initiate passive restoration. References Abella, S.R. and J.D. Springer. 2008. Estimating soil seed bank characteristics in Ponderosa Pine forests using vegetation and forest floor data. USDA forest service. RMRS-RN-35. Bell, G. 1997. Ecology and management of Arundo donax, and approaches to riparian habitat restoration in Southern California. Pages 103­113 in J.H. Brock, M. Wade, P. Pysek and D. Green (eds), Plant Invasions: Studies from North America and Europe. Leiden, Netherlands: Blackhuys Publishers. Coteff, C. and O.W. Van Auken. 2006. Sampling requirements for estimation of the soil

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Nov 3, 2014

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