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Mind the Gap: Stated versus Revealed Donations and the Differential Role of Behavioral Factors

Mind the Gap: Stated versus Revealed Donations and the Differential Role of Behavioral Factors <p>ABSTRACT:</p><p>This paper uses a contingent valuation study and an actual donation request to assess the impact of behavioral factors on hypothetical bias in stated willingness-to-pay estimates. Our findings indicate that both the number of respondents willing to donate and the amount they are willing to donate differ substantially between treatments. Behavioral factors play a substantial and significant role; in particular, the extent of warm glow derived from giving and expectations about other people&apos;s behavior increase the extent of hypothetical bias in stated willingness-to-pay estimates. We suggest ways in which this may be incorporated in future contingent valuation study design. <i>(JEL Q51)</i></p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Land Economics University of Wisconsin Press

Mind the Gap: Stated versus Revealed Donations and the Differential Role of Behavioral Factors

Land Economics , Volume 95 (2) – Apr 11, 2019

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright by the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System.
ISSN
1543-8325

Abstract

<p>ABSTRACT:</p><p>This paper uses a contingent valuation study and an actual donation request to assess the impact of behavioral factors on hypothetical bias in stated willingness-to-pay estimates. Our findings indicate that both the number of respondents willing to donate and the amount they are willing to donate differ substantially between treatments. Behavioral factors play a substantial and significant role; in particular, the extent of warm glow derived from giving and expectations about other people&apos;s behavior increase the extent of hypothetical bias in stated willingness-to-pay estimates. We suggest ways in which this may be incorporated in future contingent valuation study design. <i>(JEL Q51)</i></p>

Journal

Land EconomicsUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Apr 11, 2019

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