Migratory Bird Harvest in Northwestern Alaska: A Zooarchaeological Analysis of Ipiutak and Thule Occupations from the Deering Archaeological District

Migratory Bird Harvest in Northwestern Alaska: A Zooarchaeological Analysis of Ipiutak and Thule... Abstract: Until 2003, it was illegal to hunt migratory birds in Alaska during the spring and summer. Even though many Alaska Natives have a long history of hunting migratory birds, use of these resources is not well documented. Here we present our preliminary analyses of the bird remains recovered from the Deering Archaeological District (49-KTZ-169), located in Deering, Northwest Alaska. Relatively large bird assemblages from two sites (KTZ-299 and 300) provide information on the use of birds during both Ipiutak and Thule occupations dating between about 1300 and 800 years ago. We find strong evidence that the Ipiutak and Thule people inhabiting the sites relied heavily on migratory birds, including ducks, geese, and murres. Zooarchaeological analyses demonstrate that Alaska Natives and their ancestors have been using migratory birds in this region during the spring and summer for more than a dozen centuries. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Arctic Anthropology University of Wisconsin Press

Migratory Bird Harvest in Northwestern Alaska: A Zooarchaeological Analysis of Ipiutak and Thule Occupations from the Deering Archaeological District

Arctic Anthropology, Volume 44 (1) – Mar 30, 2007

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1933-8139
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract: Until 2003, it was illegal to hunt migratory birds in Alaska during the spring and summer. Even though many Alaska Natives have a long history of hunting migratory birds, use of these resources is not well documented. Here we present our preliminary analyses of the bird remains recovered from the Deering Archaeological District (49-KTZ-169), located in Deering, Northwest Alaska. Relatively large bird assemblages from two sites (KTZ-299 and 300) provide information on the use of birds during both Ipiutak and Thule occupations dating between about 1300 and 800 years ago. We find strong evidence that the Ipiutak and Thule people inhabiting the sites relied heavily on migratory birds, including ducks, geese, and murres. Zooarchaeological analyses demonstrate that Alaska Natives and their ancestors have been using migratory birds in this region during the spring and summer for more than a dozen centuries.

Journal

Arctic AnthropologyUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Mar 30, 2007

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