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Locating the Literary in New Media

Locating the Literary in New Media J O S E P H TA B B I Thomas Foster, The Souls of Cyberfolk: Posthumanism as Vernacular Theory. Minneapolis and London: University of Minnesota Press, 2005. xxix + 312 pp. $74.95; $24.95 paper. N. Katherine Hayles, My Mother Was a Computer: Digital Subjects and Literary Texts. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 2005. x + 290 pp. $55.00; $22.00 paper. Martin Kevorkian, Color Monitors: The Black Face of Technology in America. Ithaca, NY, and London: Cornell University Press, 2006. xii + 204 pp. $17.95 paper. Matthew G. Kirschenbaum, Mechanisms: New Media and the Forensic Imagination. Cambridge, MA, and London: MIT Press, 2008. xvii + 296 pp. $35.00. nly in North American academia would the first three titles listed above have appeared before the fourth. Only here would "culture" be the first thing literary scholars think of writing about when confronted with a transformation in the material media of our own practice. Works of literature are cited in these first three books, occasionally as participants in the transformation but more often as casualties or, at best, as well-crafted, all-too-human expressions of what it feels like to live through the transformation. Race in Thomas Foster and Martin http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Literature University of Wisconsin Press

Locating the Literary in New Media

Contemporary Literature , Volume 49 (2) – Aug 28, 2008

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System
ISSN
1548-9949
Publisher site
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Abstract

J O S E P H TA B B I Thomas Foster, The Souls of Cyberfolk: Posthumanism as Vernacular Theory. Minneapolis and London: University of Minnesota Press, 2005. xxix + 312 pp. $74.95; $24.95 paper. N. Katherine Hayles, My Mother Was a Computer: Digital Subjects and Literary Texts. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 2005. x + 290 pp. $55.00; $22.00 paper. Martin Kevorkian, Color Monitors: The Black Face of Technology in America. Ithaca, NY, and London: Cornell University Press, 2006. xii + 204 pp. $17.95 paper. Matthew G. Kirschenbaum, Mechanisms: New Media and the Forensic Imagination. Cambridge, MA, and London: MIT Press, 2008. xvii + 296 pp. $35.00. nly in North American academia would the first three titles listed above have appeared before the fourth. Only here would "culture" be the first thing literary scholars think of writing about when confronted with a transformation in the material media of our own practice. Works of literature are cited in these first three books, occasionally as participants in the transformation but more often as casualties or, at best, as well-crafted, all-too-human expressions of what it feels like to live through the transformation. Race in Thomas Foster and Martin

Journal

Contemporary LiteratureUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Aug 28, 2008

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