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Lead Water Pipes and Infant Mortality at the Turn of the Twentieth Century

Lead Water Pipes and Infant Mortality at the Turn of the Twentieth Century Abstract: In 1897, about half of all American municipalities used lead pipes to distribute water. Employing data from Massachusetts, this paper compares infant death rates in cities that used lead water pipes to rates in cities that used nonlead pipes. In the average town in 1900, the use of lead pipes increased infant mortality by 25 to 50 percent. However, in cities using new pipes and distributing acidic water, lead pipes increased infant mortality three- to four-fold. Qualitative evidence supports the econometric results and indicates the adverse effects of lead extended beyond Massachusetts. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Human Resources University of Wisconsin Press

Lead Water Pipes and Infant Mortality at the Turn of the Twentieth Century

Journal of Human Resources , Volume 43 (3) – Apr 4, 2008

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1548-8004
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract: In 1897, about half of all American municipalities used lead pipes to distribute water. Employing data from Massachusetts, this paper compares infant death rates in cities that used lead water pipes to rates in cities that used nonlead pipes. In the average town in 1900, the use of lead pipes increased infant mortality by 25 to 50 percent. However, in cities using new pipes and distributing acidic water, lead pipes increased infant mortality three- to four-fold. Qualitative evidence supports the econometric results and indicates the adverse effects of lead extended beyond Massachusetts.

Journal

Journal of Human ResourcesUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Apr 4, 2008

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