Joseph Anton's Digital Doppelgänger: Salman Rushdie and the Rhetoric of Self-Fashioning

Joseph Anton's Digital Doppelgänger: Salman Rushdie and the Rhetoric of Self-Fashioning JACLYN PARTYKA Joseph Anton’s Digital Doppelgänger: Salman Rushdie and the Rhetoric of Self-Fashioning @SalmanRushdie―who are you? why are you pretending to be me? Re- lease this username. you are a phoney. all followers please note. Salman Rushdie, 15 Sept. 2011, 5:50 p.m. Tweet. n September 2015, Salman Rushdie sat for an interview on PBS NewsHour to discuss his latest novel, Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights (2015). He discussed topics such as c fi tion’s relationship to history, the need to preserve cultural artifacts, and the decline of political engagement in the face of atroc- ity, but the online article accompanying the interview displayed the following headline: “Why Salman Rushdie Is Probably Quitting Twie tt r” (Carlson and Segal). At first glance, these two versions of Rushdie―the respected novelist and the online celebrity―seem di- ametrically opposed. However, in light of how digital self-narration is shaping the way readers engage with literary celebrities and their works, this discrepancy invites a renewed discussion of how the performance of contemporary authorship is increasingly strained across genre and medium. Taking seriously the contradictory im- ages of Rushdie’s authorship presented here, I attribute this conflict A version of this essay was presented at http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Literature University of Wisconsin Press

Joseph Anton's Digital Doppelgänger: Salman Rushdie and the Rhetoric of Self-Fashioning

Contemporary Literature, Volume 58 (2) – Apr 10, 2018

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin.
ISSN
1548-9949

Abstract

JACLYN PARTYKA Joseph Anton’s Digital Doppelgänger: Salman Rushdie and the Rhetoric of Self-Fashioning @SalmanRushdie―who are you? why are you pretending to be me? Re- lease this username. you are a phoney. all followers please note. Salman Rushdie, 15 Sept. 2011, 5:50 p.m. Tweet. n September 2015, Salman Rushdie sat for an interview on PBS NewsHour to discuss his latest novel, Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights (2015). He discussed topics such as c fi tion’s relationship to history, the need to preserve cultural artifacts, and the decline of political engagement in the face of atroc- ity, but the online article accompanying the interview displayed the following headline: “Why Salman Rushdie Is Probably Quitting Twie tt r” (Carlson and Segal). At first glance, these two versions of Rushdie―the respected novelist and the online celebrity―seem di- ametrically opposed. However, in light of how digital self-narration is shaping the way readers engage with literary celebrities and their works, this discrepancy invites a renewed discussion of how the performance of contemporary authorship is increasingly strained across genre and medium. Taking seriously the contradictory im- ages of Rushdie’s authorship presented here, I attribute this conflict A version of this essay was presented at

Journal

Contemporary LiteratureUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Apr 10, 2018

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