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Is Sprawling Residential Behavior Influenced by Climate?

Is Sprawling Residential Behavior Influenced by Climate? ABSTRACT: This paper addresses the question of a causal link between climate and urban sprawl by focusing on the role local climate plays in determining household behavior regarding housing decisions. We consider the hypothesis that under warmer climates, households exhibit “sprawling behavior”: they locate in larger plots, farther away from city centers. This hypothesis is tested empirically on household data by controlling for sample selection in simultaneous equations for housing size and distance to city center. We find evidence that such sprawling behavior is related to climate, suggesting that global warming and urban sprawl reinforce each other. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Land Economics University of Wisconsin Press

Is Sprawling Residential Behavior Influenced by Climate?

Land Economics , Volume 92 (2) – Mar 29, 2016

Is Sprawling Residential Behavior Influenced by Climate?


Cyrus Grout, Jean Cavailhes, Cecile Detang-Dessendre, ` ´ ´ and Alban Thomas ABSTRACT. This paper addresses the question of a causal link between climate and urban sprawl by focusing on the role local climate plays in determining household behavior regarding housing decisions. We consider the hypothesis that under warmer climates, households exhibit "sprawling behavior": they locate in larger plots, farther away from city centers. This hypothesis is tested empirically on household data by controlling for sample selection in simultaneous equations for housing size and distance to city center. We find evidence that such sprawling behavior is related to climate, suggesting that global warming and urban sprawl reinforce each other. (JEL C34, R14) I. INTRODUCTION The primary environmental concerns associated with urban sprawl are excessive consumption of land resources and increased greenhouse gas emissions due to the commutes associated with diffuse and uncoordinated patterns of urban expansion (IPCC 2014). Both of these concerns link urban sprawl to contributions to climate change. Here, we explore a different link: the relationship between climate and the spatial organization of cities, specifically the effect of climate on urban sprawl. If this effect is demonstrated, a second conclusion emerges, namely, that global warming and urban sprawl, which have emerged as two major environmental concerns, are linked in a vicious circle: the latter contributes to the former, and vice versa. The primary causes of urban sprawl have been well identified in the economic literature. Rising incomes and auto-driven changes in transportation costs are the fundamental driv · · 92 (2): 203­219 ISSN 0023-7639; E-ISSN 1543-8325 2016 by the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System ers of sprawling development (Glaeser and Kahn 2004), and the movement of the middle class to the suburbs has been in part a response to fiscal and social...
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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright by the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System.
ISSN
1543-8325
Publisher site
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Abstract

ABSTRACT: This paper addresses the question of a causal link between climate and urban sprawl by focusing on the role local climate plays in determining household behavior regarding housing decisions. We consider the hypothesis that under warmer climates, households exhibit “sprawling behavior”: they locate in larger plots, farther away from city centers. This hypothesis is tested empirically on household data by controlling for sample selection in simultaneous equations for housing size and distance to city center. We find evidence that such sprawling behavior is related to climate, suggesting that global warming and urban sprawl reinforce each other.

Journal

Land EconomicsUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Mar 29, 2016

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