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Invasive Plant Control by Livestock: From Targeted Eradication to Ecosystem Restoration

Invasive Plant Control by Livestock: From Targeted Eradication to Ecosystem Restoration Restoration Notes Restoration Notes have been a distinguishing feature of Ecological Restoration for more than 25 years. This section is geared toward introducing innovative research, tools, technologies, programs, and ideas, as well as providing short-term research results and updates on ongoing efforts. Please direct submissions and inquiries to the editorial staff (ERjournal@ aesop.rutgers.edu). G.S. Kleppel, Caroline B. Girard (Biodiversity Conservation & Policy Program, University at Albany, SUNY, Albany, NY 12222, gkleppel@albany.edu, 518/442-4338), Sophia Caggiano, and Erin LaBarge (Department of Biological Sciences, University at Albany) argeted grazing (TG), the use of livestock to accomplish specific management objectives, is an effective technique for controlling invasive plants (Launchbaugh et al. 2006 and references therein). Typically, the area targeted for treatment is fenced, and modifications, such as the cutting of dense vines, are made to ensure the effectiveness of the treatment. The animals are deployed for periods of time adequate to severely "damage" the targeted species. Additional treatments, such as herbicide application, may be used as needed after the livestock has been removed. The effectiveness of TG is illustrated by its use in a cattle pasture invaded by multiflora rose (Rosa multiflora) at Glynwood Center, in Cold Spring, New York. Because cattle http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Invasive Plant Control by Livestock: From Targeted Eradication to Ecosystem Restoration

Ecological Restoration , Volume 29 (3) – Aug 13, 2011

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
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Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1543-4079
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Abstract

Restoration Notes Restoration Notes have been a distinguishing feature of Ecological Restoration for more than 25 years. This section is geared toward introducing innovative research, tools, technologies, programs, and ideas, as well as providing short-term research results and updates on ongoing efforts. Please direct submissions and inquiries to the editorial staff (ERjournal@ aesop.rutgers.edu). G.S. Kleppel, Caroline B. Girard (Biodiversity Conservation & Policy Program, University at Albany, SUNY, Albany, NY 12222, gkleppel@albany.edu, 518/442-4338), Sophia Caggiano, and Erin LaBarge (Department of Biological Sciences, University at Albany) argeted grazing (TG), the use of livestock to accomplish specific management objectives, is an effective technique for controlling invasive plants (Launchbaugh et al. 2006 and references therein). Typically, the area targeted for treatment is fenced, and modifications, such as the cutting of dense vines, are made to ensure the effectiveness of the treatment. The animals are deployed for periods of time adequate to severely "damage" the targeted species. Additional treatments, such as herbicide application, may be used as needed after the livestock has been removed. The effectiveness of TG is illustrated by its use in a cattle pasture invaded by multiflora rose (Rosa multiflora) at Glynwood Center, in Cold Spring, New York. Because cattle

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Aug 13, 2011

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