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Invasive Plant Control by Livestock: From Targeted Eradication to Ecosystem Restoration

Invasive Plant Control by Livestock: From Targeted Eradication to Ecosystem Restoration Restoration Notes Restoration Notes have been a distinguishing feature of Ecological Restoration for more than 25 years. This section is geared toward introducing innovative research, tools, technologies, programs, and ideas, as well as providing short-term research results and updates on ongoing efforts. Please direct submissions and inquiries to the editorial staff (ERjournal@ aesop.rutgers.edu). Invasive Plant Control by Livestock: From Targeted Eradication to Ecosystem Restoration G.S. Kleppel, Caroline B. Girard (Biodiversity Conservation & Policy Program, University at Albany, SUNY, Albany, NY 12222, gkleppel@albany.edu, 518/442-4338), Sophia Cag- giano, and Erin LaBarge (Department of Biological Sciences, University at Albany) argeted grazing (TG), the use of livestock to accom- Tplish specific management objectives, is an effective technique for controlling invasive plants (Launchbaugh Figure 1. Multiflora rose vitality (percent of plant with foliated, pliable stems). Mean (± 1 standard error) of 20–25 randomly selected plants et al. 2006 and references therein). Typically, the area tar- in grazed (Boer goats; dashed line) and ungrazed (solid line) portions geted for treatment is fenced, and modifications, such as of a pasture at Glynwood Center, Cold Spring, New York, May–October the cutting of dense vines, are made to ensure the effective - 2009 and April–October 2010. ness of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Invasive Plant Control by Livestock: From Targeted Eradication to Ecosystem Restoration

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1543-4079

Abstract

Restoration Notes Restoration Notes have been a distinguishing feature of Ecological Restoration for more than 25 years. This section is geared toward introducing innovative research, tools, technologies, programs, and ideas, as well as providing short-term research results and updates on ongoing efforts. Please direct submissions and inquiries to the editorial staff (ERjournal@ aesop.rutgers.edu). Invasive Plant Control by Livestock: From Targeted Eradication to Ecosystem Restoration G.S. Kleppel, Caroline B. Girard (Biodiversity Conservation & Policy Program, University at Albany, SUNY, Albany, NY 12222, gkleppel@albany.edu, 518/442-4338), Sophia Cag- giano, and Erin LaBarge (Department of Biological Sciences, University at Albany) argeted grazing (TG), the use of livestock to accom- Tplish specific management objectives, is an effective technique for controlling invasive plants (Launchbaugh Figure 1. Multiflora rose vitality (percent of plant with foliated, pliable stems). Mean (± 1 standard error) of 20–25 randomly selected plants et al. 2006 and references therein). Typically, the area tar- in grazed (Boer goats; dashed line) and ungrazed (solid line) portions geted for treatment is fenced, and modifications, such as of a pasture at Glynwood Center, Cold Spring, New York, May–October the cutting of dense vines, are made to ensure the effective - 2009 and April–October 2010. ness of

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Aug 13, 2011

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