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Inoculating Composted Pine Bark with Beneficial Organisms to Make a Disease Suppressive Compost for Container Production in Mexican Forest Nurseries

Inoculating Composted Pine Bark with Beneficial Organisms to Make a Disease Suppressive Compost... At a Mexican nursery, we compost pine bark, inoculate it with beneficial microorganisms, and use it to grow conifer seedlings in containers for reforestation. In this article, I describe how we make composted pine bark (CPB), a technically and economically viable alternative to expensive, imported growth substrates. CPB is easy to produce and can be made on a small scale, generating permanent nursery and reforestation jobs and promoting the stability of Mexican forest plantation companies. We have found that using CPB minimizes use of fungicides in the nursery. I discuss how to inoculate composted bark with bacteria (Bacillus spp.) and fungi (Trichoderma spp.) to enhance suppression of root disease organisms. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Native Plants Journal University of Wisconsin Press

Inoculating Composted Pine Bark with Beneficial Organisms to Make a Disease Suppressive Compost for Container Production in Mexican Forest Nurseries

Native Plants Journal , Volume 5 (2)

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Friends of Native Plants, LLC.
ISSN
1548-4785
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

At a Mexican nursery, we compost pine bark, inoculate it with beneficial microorganisms, and use it to grow conifer seedlings in containers for reforestation. In this article, I describe how we make composted pine bark (CPB), a technically and economically viable alternative to expensive, imported growth substrates. CPB is easy to produce and can be made on a small scale, generating permanent nursery and reforestation jobs and promoting the stability of Mexican forest plantation companies. We have found that using CPB minimizes use of fungicides in the nursery. I discuss how to inoculate composted bark with bacteria (Bacillus spp.) and fungi (Trichoderma spp.) to enhance suppression of root disease organisms.

Journal

Native Plants JournalUniversity of Wisconsin Press

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