Initial Transplant Size and Microsite Influence Transplant Survivorship and Growth of a Threatened Dune Thistle

Initial Transplant Size and Microsite Influence Transplant Survivorship and Growth of a... ABSTRACT: Identifying optimal transplant size and microsite requirements are critical challenges facing restoration practitioners, and refining this information may lead to more cost effective decisions. In this study, we evaluate the effects of transplant size and microsite on restoration success of the federal threatened Cirsium pitcheri (Pitcher’s thistle), a monocarpic perennial restricted to shoreline sand dunes of the Great Lakes in the United States, using a ten-year dataset. Using general and generalized mixed linear models, we determined how microsite variables influenced first-year-transplant survival and subsequent growth. Our data show a higher probability of first-year survival associated with larger transplants. We also found greater plant growth at higher elevations while plants on steeper slopes are smaller the year after they are transplanted. These results have implications for restoration success, which may be maximized by regulating transplant size and selecting habitat. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Initial Transplant Size and Microsite Influence Transplant Survivorship and Growth of a Threatened Dune Thistle

Ecological Restoration, Volume 35 (1) – Feb 27, 2017

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1543-4079
Publisher site
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Abstract

ABSTRACT: Identifying optimal transplant size and microsite requirements are critical challenges facing restoration practitioners, and refining this information may lead to more cost effective decisions. In this study, we evaluate the effects of transplant size and microsite on restoration success of the federal threatened Cirsium pitcheri (Pitcher’s thistle), a monocarpic perennial restricted to shoreline sand dunes of the Great Lakes in the United States, using a ten-year dataset. Using general and generalized mixed linear models, we determined how microsite variables influenced first-year-transplant survival and subsequent growth. Our data show a higher probability of first-year survival associated with larger transplants. We also found greater plant growth at higher elevations while plants on steeper slopes are smaller the year after they are transplanted. These results have implications for restoration success, which may be maximized by regulating transplant size and selecting habitat.

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Feb 27, 2017

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