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Hip to Post45

Hip to Post45 D A V I D J. Michael Szalay, Hip Figures: A Literary History of the Democratic Party. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2012. 324 pp. $24.95. "[W] here are we now?" About five years have passed since Amy Hungerford asked this question in her assessment of the "revisionary work" that was undertaken by literary historians at the dawn of the twentyfirst century.1 Juxtaposing Wendy Steiner's contribution to The Cambridge History of American Literature ("Postmodern Fictions, 1970­1990") with new scholarship by Rachel Adams, Mark McGurl, Deborah Nelson, and others, Hungerford aimed to demonstrate that "the period formerly known as contemporary" was being redefined and revitalized in exciting new ways by a growing number of scholars, particularly those associated with Post45 (410). Back then, Post45 named but a small "collective" of literary historians, "mainly just finishing first books or in the middle of second books" (416). Now, however, it designates something bigger and broader, a formidable institution dedicated to the study of American culture during the second half of the twentieth century and beyond. This institution comprises an ongoing sequence of academic conferences (including a large 1. Amy Hungerford, "On the Period Formerly Known as Contemporary," American Literary History 20.1­2 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Literature University of Wisconsin Press

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin.
ISSN
1548-9949
Publisher site
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Abstract

D A V I D J. Michael Szalay, Hip Figures: A Literary History of the Democratic Party. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2012. 324 pp. $24.95. "[W] here are we now?" About five years have passed since Amy Hungerford asked this question in her assessment of the "revisionary work" that was undertaken by literary historians at the dawn of the twentyfirst century.1 Juxtaposing Wendy Steiner's contribution to The Cambridge History of American Literature ("Postmodern Fictions, 1970­1990") with new scholarship by Rachel Adams, Mark McGurl, Deborah Nelson, and others, Hungerford aimed to demonstrate that "the period formerly known as contemporary" was being redefined and revitalized in exciting new ways by a growing number of scholars, particularly those associated with Post45 (410). Back then, Post45 named but a small "collective" of literary historians, "mainly just finishing first books or in the middle of second books" (416). Now, however, it designates something bigger and broader, a formidable institution dedicated to the study of American culture during the second half of the twentieth century and beyond. This institution comprises an ongoing sequence of academic conferences (including a large 1. Amy Hungerford, "On the Period Formerly Known as Contemporary," American Literary History 20.1­2

Journal

Contemporary LiteratureUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Nov 25, 2013

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