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Global Special Delivery

Global Special Delivery CHRISTOPHER HOLMES David Palumbo-Liu, The Deliverance of Others: Reading Literature in a Global Age. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2012. 226 pp. $23.95. nce upon a time, world literature was quite easy to identify, even at a distance. As a generalizing term for virtually anything non-Western, or anything translated, the designation "world literature" made distinguishing one's literary others a rather transparent enterprise. Despite Marx's and Goethe's idealism in describing the nineteenth century as the end of national literatures, world literature began its life as a thinly veiled stand-in for the colonial epistemology of legible, digestible difference. The influence of postcolonial studies on departments of literature helped to replace the naivete that once ¨ ´ epitomized the organizing principles of world literature with increasingly rigorous, if still problematic, methodologies for reading and classifying narratives that cross the borders of language, culture, and geography. With the return of the world to respectability in literary studies has come a protean lexicon for describing the objects and processes of a world system. Texts become cosmopolitan, trans- and international, and global under rubrics ranging from David Damrosch's "mode of circulation" in the world to Franco Moretti's admonition that the literature "around us is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Literature University of Wisconsin Press

Global Special Delivery

Contemporary Literature , Volume 55 (1)

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
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ISSN
1548-9949
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Abstract

CHRISTOPHER HOLMES David Palumbo-Liu, The Deliverance of Others: Reading Literature in a Global Age. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2012. 226 pp. $23.95. nce upon a time, world literature was quite easy to identify, even at a distance. As a generalizing term for virtually anything non-Western, or anything translated, the designation "world literature" made distinguishing one's literary others a rather transparent enterprise. Despite Marx's and Goethe's idealism in describing the nineteenth century as the end of national literatures, world literature began its life as a thinly veiled stand-in for the colonial epistemology of legible, digestible difference. The influence of postcolonial studies on departments of literature helped to replace the naivete that once ¨ ´ epitomized the organizing principles of world literature with increasingly rigorous, if still problematic, methodologies for reading and classifying narratives that cross the borders of language, culture, and geography. With the return of the world to respectability in literary studies has come a protean lexicon for describing the objects and processes of a world system. Texts become cosmopolitan, trans- and international, and global under rubrics ranging from David Damrosch's "mode of circulation" in the world to Franco Moretti's admonition that the literature "around us is

Journal

Contemporary LiteratureUniversity of Wisconsin Press

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