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Germination Timing and Seedling Growth of Poa secunda and the Invasive Grass, Bromus tectorum, in Response to Temperature: Evaluating Biotypes for Seedling Traits that Improve Establishment

Germination Timing and Seedling Growth of Poa secunda and the Invasive Grass, Bromus tectorum, in... <p>Abstract:</p><p>Cold temperature seed germination and rapid root growth influence the ability of native plants to establish in the presence of invasive winter annuals. This represents a potential problem for plant material selection in the face of climate change. If seeds sourced from cold winter climates germinate and grow rapidly early in the season, managers that select materials from warmer winter climates could miss populations with traits that promote competitive establishment at restoration sites. We examined seed germination timing and seedling growth rates of the exotic grass, <i>Bromus tectorum</i>, two wild-collected <i>Poa secunda</i> accessions, and four commercial <i>P. secunda</i> accessions under two temperature regimes (20°C day/15°C night and 10°C day/5°C night) to examine the mechanisms responsible for differences in establishment and survivorship between <i>P. secunda</i> accessions observed in a previous field study. Our results show that <i>B. tectorum</i> had earlier germination, faster root elongation, and greater total root growth than all <i>P. secunda</i> accessions in both temperature regimes. Wild-collected <i>P. secunda</i> accessions germinated later and had slower cold temperature growth rates than most commercial accessions. <i>Poa secunda</i> accessions sourced from areas with colder winter climates germinated earlier and had greater total root length in the cold temperature treatment, suggesting that source location climate can be used to select plant materials with traits beneficial for seedling establishment and tolerance of invasive winter annuals.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Germination Timing and Seedling Growth of Poa secunda and the Invasive Grass, Bromus tectorum, in Response to Temperature: Evaluating Biotypes for Seedling Traits that Improve Establishment

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1543-4079

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>Cold temperature seed germination and rapid root growth influence the ability of native plants to establish in the presence of invasive winter annuals. This represents a potential problem for plant material selection in the face of climate change. If seeds sourced from cold winter climates germinate and grow rapidly early in the season, managers that select materials from warmer winter climates could miss populations with traits that promote competitive establishment at restoration sites. We examined seed germination timing and seedling growth rates of the exotic grass, <i>Bromus tectorum</i>, two wild-collected <i>Poa secunda</i> accessions, and four commercial <i>P. secunda</i> accessions under two temperature regimes (20°C day/15°C night and 10°C day/5°C night) to examine the mechanisms responsible for differences in establishment and survivorship between <i>P. secunda</i> accessions observed in a previous field study. Our results show that <i>B. tectorum</i> had earlier germination, faster root elongation, and greater total root growth than all <i>P. secunda</i> accessions in both temperature regimes. Wild-collected <i>P. secunda</i> accessions germinated later and had slower cold temperature growth rates than most commercial accessions. <i>Poa secunda</i> accessions sourced from areas with colder winter climates germinated earlier and had greater total root length in the cold temperature treatment, suggesting that source location climate can be used to select plant materials with traits beneficial for seedling establishment and tolerance of invasive winter annuals.</p>

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Aug 9, 2016

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