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Gender Wage Disparities among the Highly Educated

Gender Wage Disparities among the Highly Educated Abstract: We examine gender wage disparities for four groups of college-educated women—black, Hispanic, Asian, and non-Hispanic white—using the National Survey of College Graduates. Raw log wage gaps, relative to non-Hispanic white male counterparts, generally exceed -0.30. Estimated gaps decline to between -0.08 and -0.19 in nonparametric analyses that (1) restrict attention to individuals who speak English at home and (2) match individuals on age, highest degree, and major. Among women with work experience comparable to men's, these estimated gaps are smaller yet—between -0.004 and -0.13. Importantly, we find that inferences from familiar regression-based decompositions can be quite misleading. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Human Resources University of Wisconsin Press

Gender Wage Disparities among the Highly Educated

Journal of Human Resources , Volume 43 (3) – Apr 4, 2008

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1548-8004
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Abstract

Abstract: We examine gender wage disparities for four groups of college-educated women—black, Hispanic, Asian, and non-Hispanic white—using the National Survey of College Graduates. Raw log wage gaps, relative to non-Hispanic white male counterparts, generally exceed -0.30. Estimated gaps decline to between -0.08 and -0.19 in nonparametric analyses that (1) restrict attention to individuals who speak English at home and (2) match individuals on age, highest degree, and major. Among women with work experience comparable to men's, these estimated gaps are smaller yet—between -0.004 and -0.13. Importantly, we find that inferences from familiar regression-based decompositions can be quite misleading.

Journal

Journal of Human ResourcesUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Apr 4, 2008

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