From the Editor

From the Editor N AT I V E P L A N T S J O U R N A L An eclectic forum for dispersing practical information about planting and growing native plants. E D I T OR MANAGING EDITOR R Kasten Dumroese A SSOCIATE EDITORS Candace J Akins Robert D Cox, Diane Haase, Rosemary L Pendleton, Deborah L Rogers, Nancy L Shaw, Daniela J Shebitz, Steven E Smith, Sandra B Wilson All papers undergo peer review. Refereed research papers meet high scientific standards. General technical reports provide pragmatic information. Authors are responsible for content and accuracy of their articles. All views and conclusions are those of the authors of the articles and not necessarily those of the editorial staff or the University of Wisconsin Press. Trade names are used for the information and convenience of the reader, and do not imply endorsement or preferential treatment by the University of Wisconsin or any other public agency. The University of Wisconsin is an equal opportunity and affirmative action employer and educational institution. Native Plants Journal publishes research involving pesticides, but such pesticides are not recommended. All uses of pesticides must be registered by appropriate state and/or federal agencies before they can be recommended. Pesticides can injure humans, domestic animals, desirable plants, and fish or other wildlife if improperly handled or applied. Read the pesticide label before purchasing, and use pesticides selectively and carefully. Follow label directions for disposal of surplus pesticides and pesticide containers. C ORRESPONDENCE Growing up, I chased butterflies and moths for my collection. The flowers in my grandmother's garden were a prime hunting spot, as was the large field of clover across the street. The big fritillaries were always desired species, and the pursuit of a "perfect specimen" led me to start rearing my own caterpillars in the garage, much to the chagrin of my mother. She never grew accustomed to going into the garage at night and hearing the chomping of dozens of caterpillars, much less when the giant hickory horned devils made their escape one evening. Perhaps those early dealings with Lepidoptera are why I'm a bit partial to articles that combine native plants and butterflies. This issue has 2 fine articles about growing violets, the source food for the regal fritillary butterfly in the Midwest and for several species of checkerspot butterflies in the western US. These low-statured plants present a challenge when it comes to seed collection, but the methods described should alleviate that problem and are most likely applicable to many other species that grow low to the ground. We also have word on a new legume for restoration in South Texas; information on how to collect, clean, store, and germinate seeds of rubber rabbitbrush (I love that name); and protocols for producing some difficult-to-grow species in the northern Rocky Mountains. And, this issue contains the annual Native Plant Materials Directory. Be sure to tell your friends about Native Plants Journal. Manuscripts must be submitted via the Internet. See the first issue of each volume for complete author instructions or visit http://npj.msubmit.net. Address all subscription, business, back issue, bulk order, and advertising inquiries to: University of Wisconsin Press Journals Division 1930 Monroe Street, 3rd Fl Madison, WI 53711-2059 USA 608.263.0668 uwpress.wisc.edu/journals SU B SCRIPTIONS R Kasten Dumroese Subscription rates are: Institutions US$ 160 print and electronic US$ 105 electronic only Individuals US$ 60 print and electronic US$ 50 electronic only Foreign postage is $27. P E RM ISSION TO REPRINT No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, transmitted, or distributed, in any form, by any means electronic, mechanical, photographic, or otherwise, without the prior permission of the University of Wisconsin Press. For educational reprinting, please contact the Copyright Clearance Center (1.508.744.3350). For all other permissions, please contact permissions@uwpress.wisc.edu P U B LI SHING Native Plants Journal is published 3 times each year (Apr, Aug, Dec) by the University of Wisconsin Press ISSN 1522-8339 E-ISSN 1548-4785 Copyright © 2014 the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System On the cover: Lewis' mockorange (Philadelphus lewisii Pursh [Hydrangeaceae]). Photo by R Kasten Dumroese 89 N AT I VEP L AN TS | 1 5 | 2 | SUMMER 2014 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Native Plants Journal University of Wisconsin Press

From the Editor

Native Plants Journal, Volume 15 (2) – Aug 18, 2014

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Native Plants Journal Inc.
ISSN
1548-4785
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Abstract

N AT I V E P L A N T S J O U R N A L An eclectic forum for dispersing practical information about planting and growing native plants. E D I T OR MANAGING EDITOR R Kasten Dumroese A SSOCIATE EDITORS Candace J Akins Robert D Cox, Diane Haase, Rosemary L Pendleton, Deborah L Rogers, Nancy L Shaw, Daniela J Shebitz, Steven E Smith, Sandra B Wilson All papers undergo peer review. Refereed research papers meet high scientific standards. General technical reports provide pragmatic information. Authors are responsible for content and accuracy of their articles. All views and conclusions are those of the authors of the articles and not necessarily those of the editorial staff or the University of Wisconsin Press. Trade names are used for the information and convenience of the reader, and do not imply endorsement or preferential treatment by the University of Wisconsin or any other public agency. The University of Wisconsin is an equal opportunity and affirmative action employer and educational institution. Native Plants Journal publishes research involving pesticides, but such pesticides are not recommended. All uses of pesticides must be registered by appropriate state and/or federal agencies before they can be recommended. Pesticides can injure humans, domestic animals, desirable plants, and fish or other wildlife if improperly handled or applied. Read the pesticide label before purchasing, and use pesticides selectively and carefully. Follow label directions for disposal of surplus pesticides and pesticide containers. C ORRESPONDENCE Growing up, I chased butterflies and moths for my collection. The flowers in my grandmother's garden were a prime hunting spot, as was the large field of clover across the street. The big fritillaries were always desired species, and the pursuit of a "perfect specimen" led me to start rearing my own caterpillars in the garage, much to the chagrin of my mother. She never grew accustomed to going into the garage at night and hearing the chomping of dozens of caterpillars, much less when the giant hickory horned devils made their escape one evening. Perhaps those early dealings with Lepidoptera are why I'm a bit partial to articles that combine native plants and butterflies. This issue has 2 fine articles about growing violets, the source food for the regal fritillary butterfly in the Midwest and for several species of checkerspot butterflies in the western US. These low-statured plants present a challenge when it comes to seed collection, but the methods described should alleviate that problem and are most likely applicable to many other species that grow low to the ground. We also have word on a new legume for restoration in South Texas; information on how to collect, clean, store, and germinate seeds of rubber rabbitbrush (I love that name); and protocols for producing some difficult-to-grow species in the northern Rocky Mountains. And, this issue contains the annual Native Plant Materials Directory. Be sure to tell your friends about Native Plants Journal. Manuscripts must be submitted via the Internet. See the first issue of each volume for complete author instructions or visit http://npj.msubmit.net. Address all subscription, business, back issue, bulk order, and advertising inquiries to: University of Wisconsin Press Journals Division 1930 Monroe Street, 3rd Fl Madison, WI 53711-2059 USA 608.263.0668 uwpress.wisc.edu/journals SU B SCRIPTIONS R Kasten Dumroese Subscription rates are: Institutions US$ 160 print and electronic US$ 105 electronic only Individuals US$ 60 print and electronic US$ 50 electronic only Foreign postage is $27. P E RM ISSION TO REPRINT No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, transmitted, or distributed, in any form, by any means electronic, mechanical, photographic, or otherwise, without the prior permission of the University of Wisconsin Press. For educational reprinting, please contact the Copyright Clearance Center (1.508.744.3350). For all other permissions, please contact permissions@uwpress.wisc.edu P U B LI SHING Native Plants Journal is published 3 times each year (Apr, Aug, Dec) by the University of Wisconsin Press ISSN 1522-8339 E-ISSN 1548-4785 Copyright © 2014 the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System On the cover: Lewis' mockorange (Philadelphus lewisii Pursh [Hydrangeaceae]). Photo by R Kasten Dumroese 89 N AT I VEP L AN TS | 1 5 | 2 | SUMMER 2014

Journal

Native Plants JournalUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Aug 18, 2014

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