Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Flood Risk, Local Hazard Mitigation, and the Community Rating System of the National Flood Insurance Program

Flood Risk, Local Hazard Mitigation, and the Community Rating System of the National Flood... <p>ABSTRACT:</p><p>Using panel data for North Carolina communities, we estimate dynamic regression models of flood mitigation projects as recognized by the Community Rating System (CRS) of the National Flood Insurance Program. We find serial correlation in CRS points, which we interpret as incremental persistence that reflects physical and human capital accumulation. We find greater levels of mitigation in communities with larger tax revenues and lower levels of crime and unemployment, and a weak, but significant, effect due to recent flood experience. Socioeconomic factors also affect hazard mitigation; CRS points are greater in communities with greater median household income and higher population density.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Land Economics University of Wisconsin Press

Flood Risk, Local Hazard Mitigation, and the Community Rating System of the National Flood Insurance Program

Land Economics , Volume 94 (2) – Apr 17, 2018

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-wisconsin-press/flood-risk-local-hazard-mitigation-and-the-community-rating-system-of-KqKwhJ6N3n
Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright by the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System.
ISSN
1543-8325

Abstract

<p>ABSTRACT:</p><p>Using panel data for North Carolina communities, we estimate dynamic regression models of flood mitigation projects as recognized by the Community Rating System (CRS) of the National Flood Insurance Program. We find serial correlation in CRS points, which we interpret as incremental persistence that reflects physical and human capital accumulation. We find greater levels of mitigation in communities with larger tax revenues and lower levels of crime and unemployment, and a weak, but significant, effect due to recent flood experience. Socioeconomic factors also affect hazard mitigation; CRS points are greater in communities with greater median household income and higher population density.</p>

Journal

Land EconomicsUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Apr 17, 2018

There are no references for this article.