Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Exile and Cunning: The Tactical Difficulties of George Lamming

Exile and Cunning: The Tactical Difficulties of George Lamming J. D I L L O N B R O W N Let us never cease from thinking--what is this "civilization" in which we find ourselves? Virginia Woolf, Three Guineas eorge Lamming is one of an important group of pioneering Caribbean novelists, commonly called the Windrush generation, who are given credit for the efflorescence of West Indian fiction in the 1950s.1 Like those of his contemporaries, Lamming's novels--contemporaneous with political independence movements across the region--were strongly invested in establishing a specifically anticolonial regional-national cultural identity. The criticism that has subsequently grown up around his work has accordingly focused on issues relating to its Caribbean contexts and resonances. While such examinations have clear importance (and certainly comply with Lamming's intentions of exerting social and political influence at home), they tend to overlook an important aspect of the novels' production: these foundational West Indian novels were written and published in London, the metropolitan capital of the British Empire. Although it may seem counterintuitive to discuss such polemically anticolonial literature in its metropolitan context, the importance of this context should not be overlooked. Indeed, 1. Other novelists in the group include Edgar Mittelholzer, Samuel Selvon, Roger Mais, Jan Carew, John Hearne, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Literature University of Wisconsin Press

Exile and Cunning: The Tactical Difficulties of George Lamming

Contemporary Literature , Volume 47 (4) – Feb 16, 2006

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-wisconsin-press/exile-and-cunning-the-tactical-difficulties-of-george-lamming-u0GbY788lX
Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin.
ISSN
1548-9949
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

J. D I L L O N B R O W N Let us never cease from thinking--what is this "civilization" in which we find ourselves? Virginia Woolf, Three Guineas eorge Lamming is one of an important group of pioneering Caribbean novelists, commonly called the Windrush generation, who are given credit for the efflorescence of West Indian fiction in the 1950s.1 Like those of his contemporaries, Lamming's novels--contemporaneous with political independence movements across the region--were strongly invested in establishing a specifically anticolonial regional-national cultural identity. The criticism that has subsequently grown up around his work has accordingly focused on issues relating to its Caribbean contexts and resonances. While such examinations have clear importance (and certainly comply with Lamming's intentions of exerting social and political influence at home), they tend to overlook an important aspect of the novels' production: these foundational West Indian novels were written and published in London, the metropolitan capital of the British Empire. Although it may seem counterintuitive to discuss such polemically anticolonial literature in its metropolitan context, the importance of this context should not be overlooked. Indeed, 1. Other novelists in the group include Edgar Mittelholzer, Samuel Selvon, Roger Mais, Jan Carew, John Hearne,

Journal

Contemporary LiteratureUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Feb 16, 2006

There are no references for this article.