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Estranged Pain: Anne Carson’s Red Doc>

Estranged Pain: Anne Carson’s Red Doc> ROY SCRANTON Anne Carson, Red Doc>. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2013. 192 pp. $24.95. "You Burn Me" mong the Anne Carson books on my shelf are a few that are mementos of a bad romance. They had belonged to the lover who'd introduced me to Carson's work and still bear her marks: a passionate dedication, carefully scripted annotations, studious underlining. Such entanglements between poetry and life, between the eros of bodies and the eros of words, are elemental to Anne Carson's work, and for her, such entanglements always limn a void--lack pangful with longing, grief, lost lives surviving in tatters and hearsay. Like her contemporary and best point of comparison, Charles Bernstein (born, as was she, in 1950), Carson has made her subject loss. Yet although Carson and Bernstein share this subject, as well as an experimental aesthetic, a pop sensibility, a Socratic persona, and a complicated relationship with the academy, the two poets differ markedly in how their work makes connections around that loss, both socially and poetically. Bernstein is unabashedly political and polemical, while Carson explores the quotidian sorrows of familial and romantic relationships; Bernstein follows Louis Zukof- The subtitles punctuating this essay are fragments http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Literature University of Wisconsin Press

Estranged Pain: Anne Carson’s Red Doc>

Contemporary Literature , Volume 55 (1)

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin.
ISSN
1548-9949
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Abstract

ROY SCRANTON Anne Carson, Red Doc>. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2013. 192 pp. $24.95. "You Burn Me" mong the Anne Carson books on my shelf are a few that are mementos of a bad romance. They had belonged to the lover who'd introduced me to Carson's work and still bear her marks: a passionate dedication, carefully scripted annotations, studious underlining. Such entanglements between poetry and life, between the eros of bodies and the eros of words, are elemental to Anne Carson's work, and for her, such entanglements always limn a void--lack pangful with longing, grief, lost lives surviving in tatters and hearsay. Like her contemporary and best point of comparison, Charles Bernstein (born, as was she, in 1950), Carson has made her subject loss. Yet although Carson and Bernstein share this subject, as well as an experimental aesthetic, a pop sensibility, a Socratic persona, and a complicated relationship with the academy, the two poets differ markedly in how their work makes connections around that loss, both socially and poetically. Bernstein is unabashedly political and polemical, while Carson explores the quotidian sorrows of familial and romantic relationships; Bernstein follows Louis Zukof- The subtitles punctuating this essay are fragments

Journal

Contemporary LiteratureUniversity of Wisconsin Press

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