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Erratum for Vol. 39, No. 3, 2021

Erratum for Vol. 39, No. 3, 2021 ABSTRACTS Climate Change 299 Other Communities 301 Coastal and Marine Communities 299 Propagation and Introduction 302 Ecological Design 300 Reclamation, Rehabilitation and Remediation 302 Ecological Literacy 300 Species at Risk 302 Economics and Ecosystem Services 300 Technology and Tools 303 Grasslands 300 Wetlands 303 Invasive and Pest Species 301 Wildlife Habitat Restoration 304 Monitoring and Adaptive Management 301 Woodlands 304 MEETINGS 306 e T Th able of Contents and the back cover for the printed issue incorrectly omitted the fourth author on the Restora - tion Note, Up Smith Creek without a Paddle: A Case Study on the Barriers to Stream Restoration Assessment. The author list should read: Jacob D.J. Peters, Sara N. Schoen, Morgan L. Rhodes and Heather P. Griscom. Front Cover Feature: e T Th acoma Narrows Bridges, Tacoma, WA is one of many bridges crossing the inlets that flow into Puget Sound. With over 2,500 miles of shoreline and 68% of the state’s total population, protection and restoration of the region requires that governance structures build bridges between the social and natural sciences. Biedenweg et al. examine the current intersection of, and barriers to, cooperative governance at the science-policy interface within Puget Sound. Image credit: David Trimbach. Back Cover Features: Top: Iris pseudacorus (Yellow flag iris) is a common invasive plant among waterways of North America. Thomson et al. describe an earthen dam removal at Greenburn Lake (South Pender Island, British Columbia) and the sub- sequent spread of this species despite practitioners following all standards for control. Their case study highlights the complexity and unintended consequences of conducting beneficial watershed restoration activities like infra - structure removal. Image credit: Tabby Fenn. Middle: Two graduate students conduct canoe-based sampling in a constructed Braddock Bay pothole on Lake Ontario. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers initiated wetland restoration there aer de ft cades of erosion compromised the marsh habitat. Removal of cattail (primarily hybrid Typha × glauca), coupled with construction of channels and potholes is showing evidence of improved wildlife access to the wetland. Image credit: Rachel Schultz. Bottom: Croton Point Park lies along the Hudson River’s east side, north of New York City. A portion of it is a former landfill capped in the 1990s and dominated by exotic plants for decades. Landscape architects have spearheaded restoration by redesigning the site to promote native meadow species that support grassland nesting birds. Pictured is a representative area of seeded tall grassland in the second year of growth which includes a developing matrix of both shorter- and longer-term species, including Monarda fistulosa (wild bergamot) and Elymus canadensis (Canada wildrye). e Th tall, spike-like non-seeded biennial Verbascum thapsus (common mullein) will drop out over time. Image credit: Marli Milano. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Erratum for Vol. 39, No. 3, 2021

Ecological Restoration , Volume 39 (4) – Nov 18, 2021

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System
ISSN
1543-4079

Abstract

ABSTRACTS Climate Change 299 Other Communities 301 Coastal and Marine Communities 299 Propagation and Introduction 302 Ecological Design 300 Reclamation, Rehabilitation and Remediation 302 Ecological Literacy 300 Species at Risk 302 Economics and Ecosystem Services 300 Technology and Tools 303 Grasslands 300 Wetlands 303 Invasive and Pest Species 301 Wildlife Habitat Restoration 304 Monitoring and Adaptive Management 301 Woodlands 304 MEETINGS 306 e T Th able of Contents and the back cover for the printed issue incorrectly omitted the fourth author on the Restora - tion Note, Up Smith Creek without a Paddle: A Case Study on the Barriers to Stream Restoration Assessment. The author list should read: Jacob D.J. Peters, Sara N. Schoen, Morgan L. Rhodes and Heather P. Griscom. Front Cover Feature: e T Th acoma Narrows Bridges, Tacoma, WA is one of many bridges crossing the inlets that flow into Puget Sound. With over 2,500 miles of shoreline and 68% of the state’s total population, protection and restoration of the region requires that governance structures build bridges between the social and natural sciences. Biedenweg et al. examine the current intersection of, and barriers to, cooperative governance at the science-policy interface within Puget Sound. Image credit: David Trimbach. Back Cover Features: Top: Iris pseudacorus (Yellow flag iris) is a common invasive plant among waterways of North America. Thomson et al. describe an earthen dam removal at Greenburn Lake (South Pender Island, British Columbia) and the sub- sequent spread of this species despite practitioners following all standards for control. Their case study highlights the complexity and unintended consequences of conducting beneficial watershed restoration activities like infra - structure removal. Image credit: Tabby Fenn. Middle: Two graduate students conduct canoe-based sampling in a constructed Braddock Bay pothole on Lake Ontario. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers initiated wetland restoration there aer de ft cades of erosion compromised the marsh habitat. Removal of cattail (primarily hybrid Typha × glauca), coupled with construction of channels and potholes is showing evidence of improved wildlife access to the wetland. Image credit: Rachel Schultz. Bottom: Croton Point Park lies along the Hudson River’s east side, north of New York City. A portion of it is a former landfill capped in the 1990s and dominated by exotic plants for decades. Landscape architects have spearheaded restoration by redesigning the site to promote native meadow species that support grassland nesting birds. Pictured is a representative area of seeded tall grassland in the second year of growth which includes a developing matrix of both shorter- and longer-term species, including Monarda fistulosa (wild bergamot) and Elymus canadensis (Canada wildrye). e Th tall, spike-like non-seeded biennial Verbascum thapsus (common mullein) will drop out over time. Image credit: Marli Milano.

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Nov 18, 2021

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