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Efficacy of Seven Invasive-Bermudagrass Removal Strategies in Three Texas Ecoregions

Efficacy of Seven Invasive-Bermudagrass Removal Strategies in Three Texas Ecoregions <p>ABSTRACT:</p><p><i>Cynodon dactylon</i> (Bermudagrass) is an invasive grass found in some southwestern U.S. grasslands and is linked to decreased wildlife abundance. <i>Cynodon dactylon</i> removal is a necessary first step in many native grassland restoration projects. We evaluated seven <i>C. dactylon</i> removal methods in three Texas ecoregions, seeking to determine which most effectively suppressed <i>C. dactylon</i> growth in varying environmental conditions. We applied treatments to 355-m2 plots throughout summer 2015 and measured aboveground, living plant biomass, height, canopy cover, and species richness within plots in April–July 2016. Six treatments reduced (<i>p</i> ≤ 0.05) <i>C. dactylon</i> canopy cover compared to untreated controls at all study sites: single and repeated glyphosate herbicide applications—with or without shredding <i>C. dactylon</i> to 3-cm height two weeks prior, a single imazapyr herbicide application, and a glyphosate, imazapic, and imazapyr herbicide combination all resulted in ≥ 98.60% <i>C. dactylon</i> canopy cover and biomass reduction. A single glyphosate application reduced <i>C. dactylon</i> canopy cover 72.13 ± 27.74% compared to controls. Shredding grass and overseeding <i>Vicia villosa</i> (hairy vetch) reduced (<i>p</i> ≤ 0.05) <i>C. dactylon</i> biomass 49.45 ± 6.92% and height 13.58 ± 0.04% but did not decrease canopy cover relative to controls in any ecoregion. Overseeding <i>V. villosa</i> and shredding <i>C. dactylon</i> prior to herbicide application resulted in greater volunteer plant species richness and greater above-soil biomass. Treatment ability to suppress <i>C. dactylon</i> growth was similar across ecoregions. This implies land managers may use <i>C. dactylon</i>-suppression methodologies standardized for the entire state of Texas and likely beyond. By utilizing our results to effectively suppress <i>C. dactylon</i>, pastures can be prepared for conversion to native rangeland and prairie ecosystems.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Efficacy of Seven Invasive-Bermudagrass Removal Strategies in Three Texas Ecoregions

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1543-4079

Abstract

<p>ABSTRACT:</p><p><i>Cynodon dactylon</i> (Bermudagrass) is an invasive grass found in some southwestern U.S. grasslands and is linked to decreased wildlife abundance. <i>Cynodon dactylon</i> removal is a necessary first step in many native grassland restoration projects. We evaluated seven <i>C. dactylon</i> removal methods in three Texas ecoregions, seeking to determine which most effectively suppressed <i>C. dactylon</i> growth in varying environmental conditions. We applied treatments to 355-m2 plots throughout summer 2015 and measured aboveground, living plant biomass, height, canopy cover, and species richness within plots in April–July 2016. Six treatments reduced (<i>p</i> ≤ 0.05) <i>C. dactylon</i> canopy cover compared to untreated controls at all study sites: single and repeated glyphosate herbicide applications—with or without shredding <i>C. dactylon</i> to 3-cm height two weeks prior, a single imazapyr herbicide application, and a glyphosate, imazapic, and imazapyr herbicide combination all resulted in ≥ 98.60% <i>C. dactylon</i> canopy cover and biomass reduction. A single glyphosate application reduced <i>C. dactylon</i> canopy cover 72.13 ± 27.74% compared to controls. Shredding grass and overseeding <i>Vicia villosa</i> (hairy vetch) reduced (<i>p</i> ≤ 0.05) <i>C. dactylon</i> biomass 49.45 ± 6.92% and height 13.58 ± 0.04% but did not decrease canopy cover relative to controls in any ecoregion. Overseeding <i>V. villosa</i> and shredding <i>C. dactylon</i> prior to herbicide application resulted in greater volunteer plant species richness and greater above-soil biomass. Treatment ability to suppress <i>C. dactylon</i> growth was similar across ecoregions. This implies land managers may use <i>C. dactylon</i>-suppression methodologies standardized for the entire state of Texas and likely beyond. By utilizing our results to effectively suppress <i>C. dactylon</i>, pastures can be prepared for conversion to native rangeland and prairie ecosystems.</p>

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Nov 22, 2018

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