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Deep Time and Process Philosophy in the Charles Olson and Robert Duncan Correspondence

Deep Time and Process Philosophy in the Charles Olson and Robert Duncan Correspondence JOSHUA S. HOEYNCK Deep Time and Process Philosophy in the Charles Olson and Robert Duncan Correspondence s the Earth’s global mean temperature rises, and as a staggering number of species go extinct, adjustments to philosophical, ethical, and literary thought are required for new and difficult sociopolitical realities. Arne Naess has been analyzing ecological catastrophe for twenty- five years, outlining his philosophy of “deep ecology” and advo- cating restrictions on population growth and industrialization. The first of Naess’s eight points for deep ecology opens up an important ethical debate: “The flourishing of human and nonhuman life on earth has inherent value. The value of nonhuman life-forms is inde- pendent of the usefulness of the nonhuman world for human pur- poses” (111). Naess’s proposition involves rethinking humanity’s relations to the planet and to other species; it also implies what Lawrence Buell terms deep ecology’s “bottom-line prescriptions,” which Buell notes are “inviting target[s]” for critics (103). “Consid- ered as ontology or aesthetics first,” he continues, “rather than as a recipe for ethics or practice, deep ecology looks more persuasive.” Buell applauds deep ecology’s philosophical “ecocentrism,” which corrects “modern culture’s underrepresentation of the degree to which humanness is ecosystemically imbricated.” In the context http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Literature University of Wisconsin Press

Deep Time and Process Philosophy in the Charles Olson and Robert Duncan Correspondence

Contemporary Literature , Volume 55 (2) – Aug 29, 2014

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin.
ISSN
1548-9949

Abstract

JOSHUA S. HOEYNCK Deep Time and Process Philosophy in the Charles Olson and Robert Duncan Correspondence s the Earth’s global mean temperature rises, and as a staggering number of species go extinct, adjustments to philosophical, ethical, and literary thought are required for new and difficult sociopolitical realities. Arne Naess has been analyzing ecological catastrophe for twenty- five years, outlining his philosophy of “deep ecology” and advo- cating restrictions on population growth and industrialization. The first of Naess’s eight points for deep ecology opens up an important ethical debate: “The flourishing of human and nonhuman life on earth has inherent value. The value of nonhuman life-forms is inde- pendent of the usefulness of the nonhuman world for human pur- poses” (111). Naess’s proposition involves rethinking humanity’s relations to the planet and to other species; it also implies what Lawrence Buell terms deep ecology’s “bottom-line prescriptions,” which Buell notes are “inviting target[s]” for critics (103). “Consid- ered as ontology or aesthetics first,” he continues, “rather than as a recipe for ethics or practice, deep ecology looks more persuasive.” Buell applauds deep ecology’s philosophical “ecocentrism,” which corrects “modern culture’s underrepresentation of the degree to which humanness is ecosystemically imbricated.” In the context

Journal

Contemporary LiteratureUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Aug 29, 2014

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