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Das Haus. Eine deutsche Literaturgeschichte 1850–1926 by Nacim Ghanbari (review)

Das Haus. Eine deutsche Literaturgeschichte 1850–1926 by Nacim Ghanbari (review) Book Reviews commentator associates with modernity (98). Christiane Arndt's chapter uses terminology from bacteriology to argue that "Fremdkorper" and capitalism have infected ¨ society in Wilhelm Raabe's Zum Wilden Mann. Susanne Balmer's excellent analysis of Gabriele Reuter's Aus guter Familie and Hedwig Dohm's Christa Ruland shows how important agency was for these writers whose novels subverted Darwinian notions of variation and adaptation to contest essentialized feminine bodies and gender roles. Finally, Nicholas Saul interprets how three novels on spiritualism and Pygmalionism--the attempt to restore or recreate bodies--come together to make readers more favorably disposed to the science, encounter an erotic body, or face anti-Semitic appropriations of the motif in the years leading up to the Second World War. Rather than closing a gap, it seems to me that these essays contribute to an ongoing conversation in scholarship about bodies and realism, whether in gender studies, such as Catriona MacLeod's Embodying Ambiguity, Metz's own research on race and inner colonialism in Stifter, or Marina Warner's and Corinna Treitel's fascinating studies on spiritualism and technologies. Ideal for the reader interested in fresh perspectives on realist `classics,' reassessments of Georg Lukacs and Walter ´ Benjamin, debates on `modernity' will make this http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Monatshefte University of Wisconsin Press

Das Haus. Eine deutsche Literaturgeschichte 1850–1926 by Nacim Ghanbari (review)

Monatshefte , Volume 105 (3) – Nov 8, 2013

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The Board of Regents of The University of Wisconsin System.
ISSN
1934-2810
Publisher site
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Abstract

Book Reviews commentator associates with modernity (98). Christiane Arndt's chapter uses terminology from bacteriology to argue that "Fremdkorper" and capitalism have infected ¨ society in Wilhelm Raabe's Zum Wilden Mann. Susanne Balmer's excellent analysis of Gabriele Reuter's Aus guter Familie and Hedwig Dohm's Christa Ruland shows how important agency was for these writers whose novels subverted Darwinian notions of variation and adaptation to contest essentialized feminine bodies and gender roles. Finally, Nicholas Saul interprets how three novels on spiritualism and Pygmalionism--the attempt to restore or recreate bodies--come together to make readers more favorably disposed to the science, encounter an erotic body, or face anti-Semitic appropriations of the motif in the years leading up to the Second World War. Rather than closing a gap, it seems to me that these essays contribute to an ongoing conversation in scholarship about bodies and realism, whether in gender studies, such as Catriona MacLeod's Embodying Ambiguity, Metz's own research on race and inner colonialism in Stifter, or Marina Warner's and Corinna Treitel's fascinating studies on spiritualism and technologies. Ideal for the reader interested in fresh perspectives on realist `classics,' reassessments of Georg Lukacs and Walter ´ Benjamin, debates on `modernity' will make this

Journal

MonatshefteUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Nov 8, 2013

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