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Conservation amidst Concrete: Urban Natural Resource Management in Southeastern Wisconsin

Conservation amidst Concrete: Urban Natural Resource Management in Southeastern Wisconsin PERSPECTIVE Brian Russart isconsin has a storied natural resource management history. Thoughts of conservation naturally flow toward the Sand Counties of Aldo Leopold, Wisconsin native John Muir, the 75-year-old restored Curtis tallgrass prairie at the University of Wisconsin­Arboretum, and State Legislator Gaylord Nelson, the founder of Earth Day. Conservation may very well be in our water, but it is the small tributaries that help sustain the flow of the state's great traditions of conservation. One of these new, small tributaries flows through Milwaukee County, the state's largest gathering of humanity and concrete, in the form of urban natural resource conservation. With 900,000 residents and thousands of hectares of natural areas, the opportunity to introduce urban conservation to a diverse group of Wisconsinites holds immense potential for urban natural resource management. As I write this, I occasionally glance out my desk window, which overlooks a small three-year-old pollinator garden. It is a mixture of native Midwestern plants and annual weeds that continually evolve from a seemingly lifeless patch of mowed turf grass into a glimpse of Wisconsin's natural history. The garden is transforming into a book that becomes more interesting to read with each turning page and a microcosm http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Conservation amidst Concrete: Urban Natural Resource Management in Southeastern Wisconsin

Ecological Restoration , Volume 28 (4) – Dec 9, 2010

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1543-4079
Publisher site
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Abstract

PERSPECTIVE Brian Russart isconsin has a storied natural resource management history. Thoughts of conservation naturally flow toward the Sand Counties of Aldo Leopold, Wisconsin native John Muir, the 75-year-old restored Curtis tallgrass prairie at the University of Wisconsin­Arboretum, and State Legislator Gaylord Nelson, the founder of Earth Day. Conservation may very well be in our water, but it is the small tributaries that help sustain the flow of the state's great traditions of conservation. One of these new, small tributaries flows through Milwaukee County, the state's largest gathering of humanity and concrete, in the form of urban natural resource conservation. With 900,000 residents and thousands of hectares of natural areas, the opportunity to introduce urban conservation to a diverse group of Wisconsinites holds immense potential for urban natural resource management. As I write this, I occasionally glance out my desk window, which overlooks a small three-year-old pollinator garden. It is a mixture of native Midwestern plants and annual weeds that continually evolve from a seemingly lifeless patch of mowed turf grass into a glimpse of Wisconsin's natural history. The garden is transforming into a book that becomes more interesting to read with each turning page and a microcosm

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Dec 9, 2010

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