Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Charting the Digital Literary Sphere

Charting the Digital Literary Sphere SIMONE MURRAY hat is the relationship between digital communication technologies and contemporary literary culture? In some ways, it is a question rarely posed at present, largely because it has been posed so often before and the often grandiose predictions formulated in response have so lamentably failed to materialize. Since the late 1980s, proponents of literary hypertext and later network-inspired variants such as interactive fiction and Twitterature have challenged literature's traditionally linear-narrative and single-author characteristics.1 Roughly simultaneously, from the early 1990s, constant academic speculation over the imminent "death of the book" cast doubt upon literature's traditional print-culture format.2 That e-books have demonstrably failed to date to eliminate codex book sales, and that even the most critically acclaimed hypertext fictions remain curiosities in the literary canon, their dissemination beset by problems of software and hardware obsolescence, has rendered the question of digital technologies' impact on contemporary literary culture Research and writing of this article were made possible by the Australian Research Council's Discovery Projects grant scheme (2012) and Monash University's Advancing Women's Research Success grant project (2014). 1. For examples of "first-generation" digital literary theory and criticism, see Bolter; Coover, "End of Books" and "Hyperfiction"; Delany and Landow; and Landow, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Literature University of Wisconsin Press

Charting the Digital Literary Sphere

Contemporary Literature , Volume 56 (2) – Sep 1, 2015

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-wisconsin-press/charting-the-digital-literary-sphere-rwh6omF77x
Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin.
ISSN
1548-9949
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

SIMONE MURRAY hat is the relationship between digital communication technologies and contemporary literary culture? In some ways, it is a question rarely posed at present, largely because it has been posed so often before and the often grandiose predictions formulated in response have so lamentably failed to materialize. Since the late 1980s, proponents of literary hypertext and later network-inspired variants such as interactive fiction and Twitterature have challenged literature's traditionally linear-narrative and single-author characteristics.1 Roughly simultaneously, from the early 1990s, constant academic speculation over the imminent "death of the book" cast doubt upon literature's traditional print-culture format.2 That e-books have demonstrably failed to date to eliminate codex book sales, and that even the most critically acclaimed hypertext fictions remain curiosities in the literary canon, their dissemination beset by problems of software and hardware obsolescence, has rendered the question of digital technologies' impact on contemporary literary culture Research and writing of this article were made possible by the Australian Research Council's Discovery Projects grant scheme (2012) and Monash University's Advancing Women's Research Success grant project (2014). 1. For examples of "first-generation" digital literary theory and criticism, see Bolter; Coover, "End of Books" and "Hyperfiction"; Delany and Landow; and Landow,

Journal

Contemporary LiteratureUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Sep 1, 2015

There are no references for this article.