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Caribbean Damselfish Recolonize Reefs Following Coral Restoration

Caribbean Damselfish Recolonize Reefs Following Coral Restoration Restoration Notes Restoration Notes have been a distinguishing feature of for more than 25 years. This section is geared toward introducing innovative research, tools, technologies, programs, and ideas, as well as providing short-term research results and updates on ongoing efforts. Please direct submissions and inquiries to the editorial staff (ERjournal@ aesop.rutgers.edu). Sarah A. Merolla (Dept. of Biological Science, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881), Allison J. Holevoet (Dept. of Biological Science, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881), Samantha L. Musser (Dept. of Biological Science, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881) and Graham E. Forrester (corresponding author: Dept. of Natural Resources Science, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881, gforrester@uri.edu) eef-building corals are foundation species that create habitats for themselves and other organisms. For this reason, coral declines over the past 30 years (Gardner et al. 2003) have triggered widespread declines in fishes that occupy coral reefs (Paddack et al. 2009). Coral restoration thus has the potential to both rebuild coral populations and recreate habitat for fishes (Rinkevich 2005), but few studies have tested whether fish populations respond to coral restoration (Caibatan 2008, Yap 2009). In this study, we document the colonization of a degraded reef http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Caribbean Damselfish Recolonize Reefs Following Coral Restoration

Ecological Restoration , Volume 31 (4) – Nov 4, 2013

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1543-4079
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Abstract

Restoration Notes Restoration Notes have been a distinguishing feature of for more than 25 years. This section is geared toward introducing innovative research, tools, technologies, programs, and ideas, as well as providing short-term research results and updates on ongoing efforts. Please direct submissions and inquiries to the editorial staff (ERjournal@ aesop.rutgers.edu). Sarah A. Merolla (Dept. of Biological Science, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881), Allison J. Holevoet (Dept. of Biological Science, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881), Samantha L. Musser (Dept. of Biological Science, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881) and Graham E. Forrester (corresponding author: Dept. of Natural Resources Science, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881, gforrester@uri.edu) eef-building corals are foundation species that create habitats for themselves and other organisms. For this reason, coral declines over the past 30 years (Gardner et al. 2003) have triggered widespread declines in fishes that occupy coral reefs (Paddack et al. 2009). Coral restoration thus has the potential to both rebuild coral populations and recreate habitat for fishes (Rinkevich 2005), but few studies have tested whether fish populations respond to coral restoration (Caibatan 2008, Yap 2009). In this study, we document the colonization of a degraded reef

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Nov 4, 2013

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