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Capoeira and Candomblé: Conformity and Resistance Through Afro-Brazilian Experience (review)

Capoeira and Candomblé: Conformity and Resistance Through Afro-Brazilian Experience (review) Luso-Brazilian Review 45:1 Merrell, Floyd. Capoeira and Candomblé:Conformity and Resistance Through Afro-Brazilian Experience. Princeton: Markus Wiener Publishers, 2005. 317 pp Floyd Merrell's Capoeira and Candomblé: Conformity and Resistance through Afro-Brazilian Experience, claims to be "neither anthropology nor sociology." The author also states in the preface that he does not "enter into current debates over fine details regarding poststructuralism, postmodernism, subaltern studies, or cultural studies," (vii) and yet he cites Butler (whom he grossly misunderstands), Bhabha, Gramsci, Deleuze and Guattari and even offhandedly answers Spivak's famous question. For Merrell, the matter is simple: "the celebrated subaltern can speak after all" (218). Although he claims only to "offer reflections" (vii) on capoeira and candomblé, Merrell proposes a repetitive theory of "becoming," reaching the not exactly groundbreaking conclusion that both capoeira and candomblé are "in the process of continually becoming something other than they were becoming" (189). in other words, are constantly changing. Merrell alternates between a chatty tone peppered with empty idiomatic expressions ("various and sundry," "part and parcel," "wheeling and dealing") and a highly academic tone where he presents his theories through convoluted charts while bombarding the reader with neologisms such as bodymindspirit and kinesomatic. Although he claims that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Luso-Brazilian Review University of Wisconsin Press

Capoeira and Candomblé: Conformity and Resistance Through Afro-Brazilian Experience (review)

Luso-Brazilian Review , Volume 45 (1) – Aug 10, 2008

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Board of Regents
ISSN
1548-9957
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Abstract

Luso-Brazilian Review 45:1 Merrell, Floyd. Capoeira and Candomblé:Conformity and Resistance Through Afro-Brazilian Experience. Princeton: Markus Wiener Publishers, 2005. 317 pp Floyd Merrell's Capoeira and Candomblé: Conformity and Resistance through Afro-Brazilian Experience, claims to be "neither anthropology nor sociology." The author also states in the preface that he does not "enter into current debates over fine details regarding poststructuralism, postmodernism, subaltern studies, or cultural studies," (vii) and yet he cites Butler (whom he grossly misunderstands), Bhabha, Gramsci, Deleuze and Guattari and even offhandedly answers Spivak's famous question. For Merrell, the matter is simple: "the celebrated subaltern can speak after all" (218). Although he claims only to "offer reflections" (vii) on capoeira and candomblé, Merrell proposes a repetitive theory of "becoming," reaching the not exactly groundbreaking conclusion that both capoeira and candomblé are "in the process of continually becoming something other than they were becoming" (189). in other words, are constantly changing. Merrell alternates between a chatty tone peppered with empty idiomatic expressions ("various and sundry," "part and parcel," "wheeling and dealing") and a highly academic tone where he presents his theories through convoluted charts while bombarding the reader with neologisms such as bodymindspirit and kinesomatic. Although he claims that

Journal

Luso-Brazilian ReviewUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Aug 10, 2008

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