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Can We Reconstruct Grasslands to Better Resist Invasion?

Can We Reconstruct Grasslands to Better Resist Invasion? PERSPECTIVE Kathryn A. Yurkonis on-native, invasive plant species pose a challenge for land-management practitioners because of their potentially adverse effects on restoration success (reviewed in D'Antonio & Meyerson 2002) and the perception that reconstructed grasslands will harbor invasive species source populations (addressed in Hirsh et al. 2013, this issue). Many studies have addressed factors that help to make some communities more resistant to invasion than others (reviewed in Hector et al. 2001) and this special issue highlights several studies that have applied these concepts in a restoration context. However, as several authors in this issue point out, a deeper understanding on how planted community structure affects invasion is needed to improve restoration practices. The propagule pool within sites and additional propagule pressure from the surrounding matrix pose challenges for practitioners as they work to establish and maintain grasslands. Early in the reconstruction process, practitioners take steps to mitigate effects of the propagule bank accumulated from often decades of agricultural production and many techniques (such as cover crops and chemical control) are used to mitigate effects of the local propagule pool before and during establishment. Non-native, invasive species pose an additional threat to successfully established plantings as a result http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Can We Reconstruct Grasslands to Better Resist Invasion?

Ecological Restoration , Volume 31 (2) – Jun 13, 2013

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
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Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
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1543-4079
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Abstract

PERSPECTIVE Kathryn A. Yurkonis on-native, invasive plant species pose a challenge for land-management practitioners because of their potentially adverse effects on restoration success (reviewed in D'Antonio & Meyerson 2002) and the perception that reconstructed grasslands will harbor invasive species source populations (addressed in Hirsh et al. 2013, this issue). Many studies have addressed factors that help to make some communities more resistant to invasion than others (reviewed in Hector et al. 2001) and this special issue highlights several studies that have applied these concepts in a restoration context. However, as several authors in this issue point out, a deeper understanding on how planted community structure affects invasion is needed to improve restoration practices. The propagule pool within sites and additional propagule pressure from the surrounding matrix pose challenges for practitioners as they work to establish and maintain grasslands. Early in the reconstruction process, practitioners take steps to mitigate effects of the propagule bank accumulated from often decades of agricultural production and many techniques (such as cover crops and chemical control) are used to mitigate effects of the local propagule pool before and during establishment. Non-native, invasive species pose an additional threat to successfully established plantings as a result

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Jun 13, 2013

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