At the Confluence of Etymology and Thinking: A Response to Jean-Luc Nancy

At the Confluence of Etymology and Thinking: A Response to Jean-Luc Nancy At the Confluence of Etymology and Thinking: A Response to Jean-Luc Nancy While searching for the original meanings of the river names of Germany, the etymologist soon discovers that in many cases the names derive from words meaning "river." So prevalent is this semantic phenomenon that it can be found even in the case of confluent rivers. Thus, the name Rhein, Anglicized as "Rhine," derives from the same complex of words that gives rise to such modern German verbs as rennen ("to run," as in the running of a race) and rinnen ("to run," as in the running of water), both of which are cognates of rhein, the Greek verb that can be found in the famous Heraclitean or pseudo-Heraclitean apothegm, panta rhei, ouden gar menei ("everything flows, nothing remains"). Apropos the name "Ruhr," which flows into the Rhine, however, the etymologist hesitates. There is a common noun in modern High German, antiquated though it may be, which corresponds to the name of the river and is, in addition, closely related to archaic words that are probably not themselves cognates of rennen and rhein but nevertheless mean something very similar. And yet, in the eyes of the etymologist, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png SubStance University of Wisconsin Press

At the Confluence of Etymology and Thinking: A Response to Jean-Luc Nancy

SubStance, Volume 40 (3) – Nov 5, 2011

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University of Wisconsin Press
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Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
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1527-2095
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Abstract

At the Confluence of Etymology and Thinking: A Response to Jean-Luc Nancy While searching for the original meanings of the river names of Germany, the etymologist soon discovers that in many cases the names derive from words meaning "river." So prevalent is this semantic phenomenon that it can be found even in the case of confluent rivers. Thus, the name Rhein, Anglicized as "Rhine," derives from the same complex of words that gives rise to such modern German verbs as rennen ("to run," as in the running of a race) and rinnen ("to run," as in the running of water), both of which are cognates of rhein, the Greek verb that can be found in the famous Heraclitean or pseudo-Heraclitean apothegm, panta rhei, ouden gar menei ("everything flows, nothing remains"). Apropos the name "Ruhr," which flows into the Rhine, however, the etymologist hesitates. There is a common noun in modern High German, antiquated though it may be, which corresponds to the name of the river and is, in addition, closely related to archaic words that are probably not themselves cognates of rennen and rhein but nevertheless mean something very similar. And yet, in the eyes of the etymologist,

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SubStanceUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Nov 5, 2011

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