Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Are Large Cats Compatible with Modern Society on the Korean Peninsula?

Are Large Cats Compatible with Modern Society on the Korean Peninsula? <p>Large cat species were historically abundant in Korea; however, most vanished during the 20th century. We examined the causes of this demise and diagnosed the feasibiity of felid restoration in modern Korea. “Pest” control during the Japanese Invasion (1910–1945) eradicated <italic>Panthera tigris</italic> (Siberian tiger), and <italic>Panthera pardus</italic> (Amur leopard). <italic>Lynx lynx</italic> (Eurasian lynx) never inhabited South Korea and were rare in North Korea. <italic>Prionailurus bengalensis</italic> (leopard cat) was profuse, but habitat loss, road kills, rodenticides, and competition with feral house cats relegated the species to rarity. Despite the extirpation of <italic>P. tigris</italic> and <italic>P. pardus</italic> on the Korean Peninsula, the South Korean Government listed all felids as “Endangered” and initiated the development of recovery plans. The North Korean Government followed but did not list <italic>P. bengalensis</italic>. We suggest that misdirected methods and plans for the restoration of felids were applied to an inappropriate species, <italic>L. lynx</italic>. For big felid restoration, we suggest three options. The first option for pre-restoration in North Korea includes two reserves adjacent to habitats of tigers and leopards in Russia and China. The second option includes two reserves in South Korea. The second option, primarily for <italic>P. pardus</italic> restoration, has more potential for success than the restoration of <italic>P. tigris</italic>. The third option delays restoration of the big cats and allocates revenues and governmental policy toward the survival of <italic>P. bengalensis</italic>. This option is a pragmatic choice with a greater probability of success, instead of focusing efforts on extirpated tigers and leopards.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Are Large Cats Compatible with Modern Society on the Korean Peninsula?

Ecological Restoration , Volume 34 (3) – Aug 9, 2016

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-wisconsin-press/are-large-cats-compatible-with-modern-society-on-the-korean-peninsula-XsOfrwZvYY
Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1543-4079

Abstract

<p>Large cat species were historically abundant in Korea; however, most vanished during the 20th century. We examined the causes of this demise and diagnosed the feasibiity of felid restoration in modern Korea. “Pest” control during the Japanese Invasion (1910–1945) eradicated <italic>Panthera tigris</italic> (Siberian tiger), and <italic>Panthera pardus</italic> (Amur leopard). <italic>Lynx lynx</italic> (Eurasian lynx) never inhabited South Korea and were rare in North Korea. <italic>Prionailurus bengalensis</italic> (leopard cat) was profuse, but habitat loss, road kills, rodenticides, and competition with feral house cats relegated the species to rarity. Despite the extirpation of <italic>P. tigris</italic> and <italic>P. pardus</italic> on the Korean Peninsula, the South Korean Government listed all felids as “Endangered” and initiated the development of recovery plans. The North Korean Government followed but did not list <italic>P. bengalensis</italic>. We suggest that misdirected methods and plans for the restoration of felids were applied to an inappropriate species, <italic>L. lynx</italic>. For big felid restoration, we suggest three options. The first option for pre-restoration in North Korea includes two reserves adjacent to habitats of tigers and leopards in Russia and China. The second option includes two reserves in South Korea. The second option, primarily for <italic>P. pardus</italic> restoration, has more potential for success than the restoration of <italic>P. tigris</italic>. The third option delays restoration of the big cats and allocates revenues and governmental policy toward the survival of <italic>P. bengalensis</italic>. This option is a pragmatic choice with a greater probability of success, instead of focusing efforts on extirpated tigers and leopards.</p>

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Aug 9, 2016

There are no references for this article.