Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

An Interview with Patrick Flanery

An Interview with Patrick Flanery P A T R I C K F L A N E R Y Courtesy of Patrick Flanery an interview with PATRICK FLANERY Conducted by Christopher Holmes hen A. S. Byatt prefaced her selections for The Guardian's best books of 2012 with the declaration that British fiction is "going through an extraordinarily various and imaginative period," she was unwittingly claiming Patrick Flanery, the Nebraskaraised, Oxford-educated author of a novel about postapartheid South Africa, as a Brit. This kind of extranational imaginary is not unique in the life of British fiction; indeed, the Man Booker Prize makes an annual show of reconstituting the Empire as a literary territory, prizing postcolonial literatures as its own. But Byatt's recommendation of Flanery's extraordinary first novel, Absolution, says something further about the state of world literature, specifically the actual production of literatures that imagine cultures and geographies unbound by national borders. In this revitalized moment for world literature, the place of production and the writer's national affiliation(s) are more often than not marginalized by discussions of what Wai Chee Dimock, in Through Other Continents, calls the "complex tangle of relations" bound up in the "shorthand" of national literatures (3). Dimock specifically argues for http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Literature University of Wisconsin Press

An Interview with Patrick Flanery

Contemporary Literature , Volume 54 (3) – Nov 25, 2013

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-wisconsin-press/an-interview-with-patrick-flanery-Pt821vyA38
Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin.
ISSN
1548-9949
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

P A T R I C K F L A N E R Y Courtesy of Patrick Flanery an interview with PATRICK FLANERY Conducted by Christopher Holmes hen A. S. Byatt prefaced her selections for The Guardian's best books of 2012 with the declaration that British fiction is "going through an extraordinarily various and imaginative period," she was unwittingly claiming Patrick Flanery, the Nebraskaraised, Oxford-educated author of a novel about postapartheid South Africa, as a Brit. This kind of extranational imaginary is not unique in the life of British fiction; indeed, the Man Booker Prize makes an annual show of reconstituting the Empire as a literary territory, prizing postcolonial literatures as its own. But Byatt's recommendation of Flanery's extraordinary first novel, Absolution, says something further about the state of world literature, specifically the actual production of literatures that imagine cultures and geographies unbound by national borders. In this revitalized moment for world literature, the place of production and the writer's national affiliation(s) are more often than not marginalized by discussions of what Wai Chee Dimock, in Through Other Continents, calls the "complex tangle of relations" bound up in the "shorthand" of national literatures (3). Dimock specifically argues for

Journal

Contemporary LiteratureUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Nov 25, 2013

There are no references for this article.