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Allometry, Morphometry, and Soil Characterization of Giant Cane (Arundinaria gigantea) Stands

Allometry, Morphometry, and Soil Characterization of Giant Cane (Arundinaria gigantea) Stands <p>ABSTRACT:</p><p>For nearly a decade, researchers have been investigating the utility of <i>Arundinaria gigantea</i> (giant cane), native to the southeastern U.S., as a riparian buffer species. Research has shown that <i>A. gigantea</i> is extremely effective at attenuating sediment and nutrients from surface and ground water. However, <i>A. gigantea</i> is difficult to establish and the relation between aboveground and belowground plant&apos;s characteristics is not known. There are no data available that can predict the area required for excavation based on the aboveground plant parameters to get enough viable rhizomes of <i>A. gigantea</i> that can be used as planting stock. Previous research has found that successful propagation of <i>A. gigantea</i> was dependent on rhizome length, the number of internodes, and rhizome buds present, but no data exist on quantifying the yield of rhizomes. Therefore, to address these concerns, we developed allometry equations for predicting belowground propagule numbers based on aboveground plant characteristics. Additionally, we analyzed soils under cane stands to determine if chemical and physical soil properties can be related to plant characteristics. Multiple regression models developed in this study indicate that total culms and average total culm diameter can predict rhizome internodes and rhizome length, and total culms and average total culm height can predict the number of rhizome buds. Significant correlations were found between soil calcium and total and dead culms; soil phosphorus and leaf to root ratio; and cation exchange capacity and rhizome internodes, suggesting an interaction between <i>A. gigantea</i> growth and the underlying soil. Results from this research improve our understanding of the dynamics of <i>A. gigantea</i> and supplement existing information to help guide ecological restoration efforts.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Allometry, Morphometry, and Soil Characterization of Giant Cane (Arundinaria gigantea) Stands

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1543-4079

Abstract

<p>ABSTRACT:</p><p>For nearly a decade, researchers have been investigating the utility of <i>Arundinaria gigantea</i> (giant cane), native to the southeastern U.S., as a riparian buffer species. Research has shown that <i>A. gigantea</i> is extremely effective at attenuating sediment and nutrients from surface and ground water. However, <i>A. gigantea</i> is difficult to establish and the relation between aboveground and belowground plant&apos;s characteristics is not known. There are no data available that can predict the area required for excavation based on the aboveground plant parameters to get enough viable rhizomes of <i>A. gigantea</i> that can be used as planting stock. Previous research has found that successful propagation of <i>A. gigantea</i> was dependent on rhizome length, the number of internodes, and rhizome buds present, but no data exist on quantifying the yield of rhizomes. Therefore, to address these concerns, we developed allometry equations for predicting belowground propagule numbers based on aboveground plant characteristics. Additionally, we analyzed soils under cane stands to determine if chemical and physical soil properties can be related to plant characteristics. Multiple regression models developed in this study indicate that total culms and average total culm diameter can predict rhizome internodes and rhizome length, and total culms and average total culm height can predict the number of rhizome buds. Significant correlations were found between soil calcium and total and dead culms; soil phosphorus and leaf to root ratio; and cation exchange capacity and rhizome internodes, suggesting an interaction between <i>A. gigantea</i> growth and the underlying soil. Results from this research improve our understanding of the dynamics of <i>A. gigantea</i> and supplement existing information to help guide ecological restoration efforts.</p>

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Nov 22, 2018

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