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Alleviating Deforestation Pressures?: Impacts of Improved Stove Dissemination on Charcoal Consumption in Urban Senegal

Alleviating Deforestation Pressures?: Impacts of Improved Stove Dissemination on Charcoal... With 2.7 billion people relying on woodfuel for cooking in developing countries, the dissemination of improved cooking stoves (ICSs) is frequently considered an effective instrument to combat deforestation, particularly in arid countries. This paper evaluates the impacts of an ICS dissemination project in urban Senegal on charcoal consumption, using data collected among 624 households. The virtue of our data is that it allows for rigorously estimating charcoal savings by accounting for both household characteristics and meal-specific cooking patterns. We find average savings of 25% per dish. In total, the intervention reduces Senegalese charcoal consumption by around 1%. (<i>JEL Q41, Q56</i>) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Land Economics University of Wisconsin Press

Alleviating Deforestation Pressures?: Impacts of Improved Stove Dissemination on Charcoal Consumption in Urban Senegal

Land Economics , Volume 89 (4) – Oct 16, 2013

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright by the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System.
ISSN
1543-8325

Abstract

With 2.7 billion people relying on woodfuel for cooking in developing countries, the dissemination of improved cooking stoves (ICSs) is frequently considered an effective instrument to combat deforestation, particularly in arid countries. This paper evaluates the impacts of an ICS dissemination project in urban Senegal on charcoal consumption, using data collected among 624 households. The virtue of our data is that it allows for rigorously estimating charcoal savings by accounting for both household characteristics and meal-specific cooking patterns. We find average savings of 25% per dish. In total, the intervention reduces Senegalese charcoal consumption by around 1%. (<i>JEL Q41, Q56</i>)

Journal

Land EconomicsUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Oct 16, 2013

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