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Abstracts

Abstracts To develop the following abstracts, the editorial staff searches more than 100 scientific journals, professional and orga - nizational newsletters, conference proceedings, and other resources for information relevant to ecological restoration practice and research. Please send suggested abstract sources to the editorial staff (ERjournal@aesop.rutgers.edu). Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science 176:12–35. Climate Change doi:10.1016/j.ecss.2016.04.003 Impacts of Niche Breadth and Dispersal Ability on Restoring ecosystem services and function can be accom- Macroevolutionary Patterns. 2016. Qiao, H., E.E. plished through ecoengineering with two primary Saupe (Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, approaches: Type A, where physico-chemical charac- eesaupe@gmail.com), J. Soberón, A.T. Peterson and teristics of the environment are altered to orchestrate a C.E. Myers. The American Naturalist 188:149‒162. subsequent “natural” change in biota; and Type B, where doi:10.1086/687201 biota are directly engineered (e.g., seeding, transplanting, restocking, etc.). In complex estuarine ecosystems, eco- Anthropogenic caused climate change is bringing with it a engineering is not enough and ecohydrology (the study wide range of challenges and unknowns. One of the most of the link between water and ecosystem function) must hotly debated questions is how fast and how much will also be used to achieve desired restoration outcomes. In our climate change. We can only http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Abstracts

Ecological Restoration , Volume 34 (4) – Nov 2, 2016

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1543-4079

Abstract

To develop the following abstracts, the editorial staff searches more than 100 scientific journals, professional and orga - nizational newsletters, conference proceedings, and other resources for information relevant to ecological restoration practice and research. Please send suggested abstract sources to the editorial staff (ERjournal@aesop.rutgers.edu). Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science 176:12–35. Climate Change doi:10.1016/j.ecss.2016.04.003 Impacts of Niche Breadth and Dispersal Ability on Restoring ecosystem services and function can be accom- Macroevolutionary Patterns. 2016. Qiao, H., E.E. plished through ecoengineering with two primary Saupe (Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, approaches: Type A, where physico-chemical charac- eesaupe@gmail.com), J. Soberón, A.T. Peterson and teristics of the environment are altered to orchestrate a C.E. Myers. The American Naturalist 188:149‒162. subsequent “natural” change in biota; and Type B, where doi:10.1086/687201 biota are directly engineered (e.g., seeding, transplanting, restocking, etc.). In complex estuarine ecosystems, eco- Anthropogenic caused climate change is bringing with it a engineering is not enough and ecohydrology (the study wide range of challenges and unknowns. One of the most of the link between water and ecosystem function) must hotly debated questions is how fast and how much will also be used to achieve desired restoration outcomes. In our climate change. We can only

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Nov 2, 2016

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